bookmarks  13

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    Basic textbook for linear algebra with worked examples, glossary, exercises, index. Web page: www.wellesleycambridge.com ·
    2 years and 4 months ago by @becker
     
      linearalgebra textbook
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      Author : Sergei Treil, Department of Mathematics, Brown University Publication Date : 2004 Excerpts from the Introduction: The title of the book sounds a bit mysterious. Why should anyone read this book if it presents the subject in a wrong way? What is particularly done "wrong" in the book? Before answering these questions, let me first describe the target audience of this text. This book appeared as lecture notes for the course "Honors Linear Algebra". It supposed to be a first linear algebra course for mathematically advanced students. It is intended for a student who, while not yet very familiar with abstract reasoning, is willing to study more rigorous mathematics that is presented in a "cookbook style" calculus type course. Besides being a first course in linear algebra it is also supposed to be a first course introducing a student to rigorous proof, formal definitions---in short, to the style of modern theoretical (abstract) mathematics. The target audience explains the very specific blend of elementary ideas and concrete examples, which are usually presented in introductory linear algebra texts with more abstract definitions and constructions typical for advanced books. Another specific of the book is that it is not written by or for an algebraist. So, I tried to emphasize the topics that are important for analysis, geometry, probability, etc., and did not include some traditional topics. For example, I am only considering vector spaces over the fields of real or complex numbers. Linear spaces over other fields are not considered at all, since I feel time required to introduce and explain abstract fields would be better spent on some more classical topics, which will be required in other disciplines. And later, when the students study general fields in an abstract algebra course they will understand that many of the constructions studied in this book will also work for general fields. Also, I treat only finite-dimensional spaces in this book and a basis always means a finite basis. The reason is that it is impossible to say something non-trivial about infinite-dimensional spaces without introducing convergence, norms, completeness etc., i.e. the basics of functional analysis. And this is definitely a subject for a separate course (text). So, I do not consider infinite Hamel bases here: they are not needed in most applications to analysis and geometry, and I feel they belong in an abstract algebra course. ·
      2 years and 4 months ago by @becker
       
        linearalgebra textbook
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        Author : Sergei Treil, Department of Mathematics, Brown University Publication Date : 2004 Excerpts from the Introduction: The title of the book sounds a bit mysterious. Why should anyone read this book if it presents the subject in a wrong way? What is particularly done "wrong" in the book? Before answering these questions, let me first describe the target audience of this text. This book appeared as lecture notes for the course "Honors Linear Algebra". It supposed to be a first linear algebra course for mathematically advanced students. It is intended for a student who, while not yet very familiar with abstract reasoning, is willing to study more rigorous mathematics that is presented in a "cookbook style" calculus type course. Besides being a first course in linear algebra it is also supposed to be a first course introducing a student to rigorous proof, formal definitions---in short, to the style of modern theoretical (abstract) mathematics. The target audience explains the very specific blend of elementary ideas and concrete examples, which are usually presented in introductory linear algebra texts with more abstract definitions and constructions typical for advanced books. Another specific of the book is that it is not written by or for an algebraist. So, I tried to emphasize the topics that are important for analysis, geometry, probability, etc., and did not include some traditional topics. For example, I am only considering vector spaces over the fields of real or complex numbers. Linear spaces over other fields are not considered at all, since I feel time required to introduce and explain abstract fields would be better spent on some more classical topics, which will be required in other disciplines. And later, when the students study general fields in an abstract algebra course they will understand that many of the constructions studied in this book will also work for general fields. Also, I treat only finite-dimensional spaces in this book and a basis always means a finite basis. The reason is that it is impossible to say something non-trivial about infinite-dimensional spaces without introducing convergence, norms, completeness etc., i.e. the basics of functional analysis. And this is definitely a subject for a separate course (text). So, I do not consider infinite Hamel bases here: they are not needed in most applications to analysis and geometry, and I feel they belong in an abstract algebra course. ·
        2 years and 4 months ago by @m.vavalis
         
          LinearAlgebra textbook
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          Basic textbook for linear algebra with worked examples, glossary, exercises, index. Web page: www.wellesleycambridge.com ·
          2 years and 4 months ago by @m.vavalis
           
            LinearAlgebra textbook
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            An introduction to linear algebra, based on lectures given by the author over 17 years, in the (now defunct) first year course MP103 at the University of Queensland. The style is somewhat formal and terse, in which you won't find any attempt of personification. Definitely a genuine textbook. Students are encouraged to try the problems, which range from the mechanical to the more subtle, the latter demanding a greater level of interaction from the student. The section on subspaces is meant to be a gentle introduction to the second course, where abstract vector spaces are met in detail. Things of substance are met here, including the rank of a matrix. The section on three dimensional geometry makes use of the earlier sections on linear equations, matrices and determinants and some of the proofs are more algebraic (even pedantic) than some readers would like. One criticism of the book has been its neglect of the computational side of the subject. This is partly a reflection of author's love of discrete things such as integers, rational numbers and finite fields and a distrust of floating point arithmetic. However, the author has written an exact arithmetic matrix program called CMAT, which performs exact calculations on matices whose elements are rational numbers, complex rational numbers or numbers from a finite field of p (prime) elements. CMAT takes the hard work out of calculating things such as the reduced row echelon form, the determinant and characteristic polynomial of a matrix. ·
            2 years and 4 months ago by @m.vavalis
             
              linearalgebra textbook
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              Appunti di geometria per fisici ·
              6 years and 11 months ago by @random3f
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            publications  22