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    A very simple example of an algorithmic problem solvable by dynamic programming is to maximize, over $A\subseteq\{1,2,\ldots,n\}$, the objective function $|A|-\sum_i\xi_i{\rm1\hspace{-0.90ex}1}(i\in A,i+1\in A)$ for given $\xi_i>0$. This problem, with random $(\xi_i)$, provides a test example for studying the relationship between optimal and near-optimal solutions of combinatorial optimization problems. We show that, amongst solutions differing from the optimal solution in a small proportion... · http://link.aip.org/link/?SMJCAT/38/2382/1
    3 years and 5 months ago
    by pitman
    1
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    The Talis Connected Commons scheme is intended to directly support the publishing and reuse of Linked Data in the public domain by removing the costs associated with those activities. The scheme is intended to support a wide range of different forms of data publishing. For example scientific researchers seeking to share their research data; dissemination of public domain data from a variety of different charitable, public sector or volunteer organizations; open data enthusiasts compiling data sets to be shared with the web community. For qualifying data sets, Talis will provide, through the Talis Platform: * Free hosting of up to 50 million RDF triples and 10Gb of content * Access to data access services that operate on that data, including data retrieval and text search * Free access to a public SPARQL endpoint for each dataset. This means that data set providers will not incur any of the commercial costs normally associated with hosting data on the Talis Platform. In addition neither the data set provider or its users will incur any usage charges relating to the use of the Platform services made available on that data. To qualify for entry into the scheme all data and content hosted in the Platform must be made available under one of the following public domain data licenses: * Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and License * Creative Commons CC0 · http://blogs.talis.com/n2/cc
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    4
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    This project aims to develop an efficient rule based extractor of entries of references, located in scientific articles in English language. The application takes a pdf file or a directory of pdf and then returns an html file, containing the list of all entries with their respective title. Moreover the title of the article cited is searched through Google Web Service to get the URL that identifying the article on the web. If the URL provides on the page a Bibtex entry, this will appear in the html output under the relative entries, stolen from some typical site like citeseer, ieeexlpore etc. The application does not make search over pdf file based on images. · http://code.google.com/p/pdftoref/
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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    CiteProc is a comprehensive solution for bibliographic and citation formatting. It consists of an easy-to-use XML citation style language (CSL), and the XSLT code to format documents based on them. In essence, it is designed to serve as an XML-based analog to BibTeX, but with dramatic improvements in ease-of-use, metadata flexibility, and international support. CiteProc reads the source document for citation references and collects the corresponding records from an external bibliographic data store, and then formats the bibliography and citations according to specifications in the CSL file. · http://bibliographic.openoffice.org/citeproc/index.html
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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    http://lists.broadminsteruniversity.org/items/50D0EFC2-7873-DCDC-A855-3DF386CDA156-74470138-68E6-3263-426C-36940B022559.html · http://imageweb.zoo.ox.ac.uk/pub/2009/citobase/cito-20090415-1.2-RC3/cito-content/owldoc/
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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    Scientific innovation depends on finding, integrating, and re-using the products of previous research. Here we explore how recent developments in Web technology, particularly those related to the publication of data and metadata, might assist that process by providing semantic enhancements to journal articles within the mainstream process of scholarly journal publishing. We exemplify this by describing semantic enhancements we have made to a recent biomedical research article taken from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, providing enrichment to its content and increased access to datasets within it. These semantic enhancements include provision of live DOIs and hyperlinks; semantic markup of textual terms, with links to relevant third-party information resources; interactive figures; a re-orderable reference list; a document summary containing a study summary, a tag cloud, and a citation analysis; and two novel types of semantic enrichment: the first, a Supporting Claims Tooltip to permit “Citations in Context”, and the second, Tag Trees that bring together semantically related terms. In addition, we have published downloadable spreadsheets containing data from within tables and figures, have enriched these with provenance information, and have demonstrated various types of data fusion (mashups) with results from other research articles and with Google Maps. We have also published machine-readable RDF metadata both about the article and about the references it cites, for which we developed a Citation Typing Ontology, CiTO (http://purl.org/net/cito/). The enhanced article, which is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0​000228.x001 , presents a compelling existence proof of the possibilities of semantic publication. We hope the showcase of examples and ideas it contains, described in this paper, will excite the imaginations of researchers and publishers, stimulating them to explore the possibilities of semantic publishing for their own research articles, and thereby break down present barriers to the discovery and re-use of information within traditional modes of scholarly communication. · http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pcbi.1000361
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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    The Economics of Open Access Publishing Open Access Publishing is the free distribution of research, whether it is as a pre-print (working paper) or a peer-reviewed article. Since the creation of the web, more and more journal are choosing open access as their business model. One of them was recently Economic Analysis and Policy, published by the Economic Society of Australia (Queensland). To celebrate this, EAP has just published a special issue dedicated to the Economics of Open Access Publishing. Articles are written by economists discussing their experience with open access as well as by others involved in open access publishing. They cover the transition the publishing industry is currently undergoing, the surprisingly low cost of publishing an open access journal, the impact of open access and various open source aspects of the open access. * Introduction, by Christian Zimmermann * The Stratified Economics of Open Access, by John Willinsky * But what have you done for me lately? Commercial Publishing, Scholarly Communication, and Open-Access, by John P. Conley and Myrna Wooders * Publishing an E-Journal on a Shoe String: Is It a Sustainable Project?, by Piero Cavaleri. Michael Keren, Giovanni B. Ramello and Vittorio Valli * Open Access Models and their Implications for the Players on the Scientific Publishing Market, by Steffen Bernius, Matthias Hanauske, Wolfgang König and Berndt Dugall * Open Access Economics Journals and the Market for Reproducible Economic Research, by B.D. McCullough * Estimating the Potential Impacts of Open Access to Research Findings, by John Houghton and Peter Sheehan * The Economics of Open Bibliographic Data Provision, by Thomas Krichel and Christian Zimmermann Possibly related posts: (automatically generated) * UK PubMed Central (UKPMC) * Periodicals Price Survey 2008: Embracing Openness * Obstacles to social scholarship * Open That Bottle Night This entry was posted on Friday, April 24th, 2009 at 1:43 am and is filed under Dissemination of research in Economics. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply. You must be logged in to post a comment. * * About this blog Welcome to the RePEc blog. We, the RePEc team, discuss here the workings of RePEc and seek input from the community on how we can improve. We also want to give more volunteers opportunity to be part of this project and provide valuable services to the profession. Finally, we also discuss issues about the · http://blog.repec.org/2009/04/24/the-economics-of-open-access-publishing/
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    3
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    The Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) is a geographically distributed virtual community of shared resources offering tremendous potential to advance the diagnosis and treatment of disease. BIRN enhances the scientific discoveries of biomedical scientists and clinical researchers across research disciplines. BIRN ... * hosts a collaborative environment rich with tools that permit uniform access to hundreds of researchers, enabling cooperation on multi-institutional investigations. * synchronizes developments in wide area networking, multiple data sources, and distributed computing. * designs, tests, and releases new integrative software tools that enable researchers to pose questions and share knowledge across multiple animal models (mouse, human, and non-human primate). * receives funding from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), established in 2001. · http://www.nbirn.net/research/index.shtm
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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    The BrainGraph Editor 1.0 Beta is a JAVA application designed to create taxonomies or hierarchies in order to classify and organize information. · http://www.nbirn.net/tools/braingraph_editor/index.shtm
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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    Mathematical software has developed during the last twenty years to an established tool in mathematical research and education. Its importance is meanwhile comparable to that of mathematical literature. In contrast to the various systematic collections of mathematical literature, collections of mathematical software so far only exist in a rudimentary manner. In order to make the existing resources more visible and to use them efficiently, it is indispensable to provide appropriate methods and tools for locating, cataloguing, reviewing, and searching of mathematical software. The intention of the Oberwolfach References on Mathematical Software (ORMS) project is to initiate the developement of a permanent provider of infrastructure. · http://orms.mfo.de/about
    5 years ago
    by pitman
    1
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