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bookmarks  172

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    The pack­age pro­vides sev­eral macros to ad­just boxed con­tent. One pur­pose is to sup­ple­ment the stan­dard graph­ics pack­age, which de­fines the macros \re­size­box, \scale­box and \ro­tate­box , with the macros\trim­box and \clip­box. The main fea­ture is the gen­eral \ad­just­box macro which ex­tends the “key=value” in­ter­face of \in­clude­graph­ics from the graph­ics pack­age and ap­plies it to gen­eral text con­tent. Ad­di­tional pro­vided box macros are \lap­box, \margin­box, \min­size­box, \max­size­box and \phan­tombox. All macros use the col­lect­box pack­age to read the con­tent as a box and not as a macro ar­gu­ment. This al­lows for all forms of con­tent in­clud­ing spe­cial ma­te­rial like ver­ba­tim con­tent. A spe­cial fea­ture of col­lect­box is used to pro­vide match­ing en­vi­ron­ments with the iden­ti­cal names as the macros.
    4 years ago by @thorade
     
      TeXpackagesoftware
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      The pack­age en­able the user to type­set pro­grams (pro­gram­ming code) within LaTeX. The source code is read di­rectly by TeX. Key­words, com­ments and strings can be type­set us­ing dif­fer­ent styles (de­fault is bold for key­words, italic for com­ments and no spe­cial style for strings). In­cludes sup­port for hy­per­ref. To use, sim­ply \usep­a­ck­age{list­ings}, iden­tify the lan­guage with \lst­set{lan­guage=Python}, then em­ploy the \be­gin{lstlist­ing} ... \end{lstlist­ing} en­vi­ron­ment or the \lstin­put­list­ing{file­name.py} com­mand. Short (in-line) list­ings are also avail­able, us­ing ei­ther \lstin­line|...| or | ... | (af­ter defin­ing the | to­ken with the \lstMakeShortIn­line com­mand).
      4 years ago by @thorade
       
        TeXpackagesoftware
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        The pack­age that fa­cil­i­tates ex­pres­sive syn­tax high­light­ing in LaTeX us­ing the pow­er­ful Pyg­ments li­brary. The pack­age also pro­vides op­tions to cus­tomize the high­lighted source code out­put us­ing fan­cyvrb.
        4 years ago by @thorade
         
          TeXpackagesoftware
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          Remmina is a remote desktop client written in GTK+, aiming to be useful for system administrators and travellers, who need to work with lots of remote computers in front of either large monitors or tiny netbooks. Remmina supports multiple network protocols in an integrated and consistent user interface. Currently RDP, VNC, NX, XDMCP and SSH are supported. Remmina is released in separated source packages: "remmina", the main GTK+ application "remmina-plugins", a set of plugins Remmina is free and open-source software, released under GNU GPL license.
          4 years ago by @thorade
           
            open-sourcesoftware
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            RStudio is a free and open source integrated development environment for R. You can run it on your desktop (Windows, Mac, or Linux) or even over the web using RStudio Server.
            5 years ago by @thorade
             
              Ropen-sourcesoftware
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              Welcome to Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! If you're reading this, chances are you want to learn Haskell. Well, you've come to the right place, but let's talk about this tutorial a bit first. I decided to write this because I wanted to solidify my own knowledge of Haskell and because I thought I could help people new to Haskell learn it from my perspective. There are quite a few tutorials on Haskell floating around on the internet. When I was starting out in Haskell, I didn't learn from just one resource. The way I learned it was by reading several different tutorials and articles because each explained something in a different way than the other did. By going through several resources, I was able put together the pieces and it all just came falling into place. So this is an attempt at adding another useful resource for learning Haskell so you have a bigger chance of finding one you like. This tutorial is aimed at people who have experience in imperative programming languages (C, C++, Java, Python …) but haven't programmed in a functional language before (Haskell, ML, OCaml …). Although I bet that even if you don't have any significant programming experience, a smart person such as yourself will be able to follow along and learn Haskell. The channel #haskell on the freenode network is a great place to ask questions if you're feeling stuck. People there are extremely nice, patient and understanding to newbies. I failed to learn Haskell approximately 2 times before finally grasping it because it all just seemed too weird to me and I didn't get it. But then once it just "clicked" and after getting over that initial hurdle, it was pretty much smooth sailing. I guess what I'm trying to say is: Haskell is great and if you're interested in programming you should really learn it even if it seems weird at first. Learning Haskell is much like learning to program for the first time — it's fun! It forces you to think differently, which brings us to the next section …
              5 years ago by @thorade
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              Presents original and review papers on all aspects of numerical algorithms Coverage includes new algorithms, theoretical results, implementation, numerical stability, complexity, parallel computing, subroutines and applications Also provides book reviews and announcements of scientific meetings The journal Numerical Algorithms presents original and review papers on all aspects of numerical algorithms: new algorithms, theoretical results, implementation, numerical stability, complexity, parallel computing, subroutines and applications. Papers on computer algebra related to obtaining numerical results also included. The journal offers high quality papers containing material not published elsewhere. The journal also provides book reviews and announcements of scientific meetings.
              5 years ago by @thorade
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              CoolProp is an open-source, free property database that includes pure fluids, pseudo-pure fluids, and humid air properties. It is designed to be trivially simple to use from the Python programming language, and possible to use from other languages as well.
              5 years ago by @thorade
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              The package enables the user to use beamer style operations on a canvas of the sizes provided by a0poster; font scaling is available (using packages such as type1cm if necessary). In addition, the package allows the user to benefit from the nice colour box handling and alignment provided by the beamer class (for example, with rounded corners and shadows). Good looking posters may be created very rapidly. Features include: scalable fonts using the fp and type1cm packages; posters in A-series sizes, and custom sizes like double A0 are possible; still applicable to custom beamer slides, e.g. 16:9 slides for a wide-screen (i.e. 1.78 aspect ratio); orientation may be portrait or landscape; a ‘debug mode’ is provided.
              5 years ago by @thorade
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              Systems modeling and simulation tool. Experiment and optimize from concept to production. Accurately simulate and analyze before making decisions. Mathematica-based.
              5 years ago by @thorade
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              Digitizing software for converting graphs and maps into numbers. Image files from scanners, digital cameras and screenshots are easily converted, and exported into spreadsheets. Introduction This open source, digitizing software converts an image file showing a graph or map, into numbers. The image file can come from a scanner, digital camera or screenshot. The numbers can be read on the screen, and written or copied to a spreadsheet. The process starts with an image file containing a graph or map. The final result is digitized data that can be used by other tools such as Microsoft Excel and Gnumeric. Engauge (from en "make" and gauge "to measure") verb meaning to convert an image file containing a graph or map, into numbers. The term "Engauge" in Engauge Digitizer was invented for this project, since there seems to be no similar term in common use. Why Would You Need This Tool? Here are some real-life examples: You are an engineer with some graphs in decades-old documents, but you really need the numbers represented in those graphs so you can do analyses that will determine if a space vehicle is safe to fly. You are a graduate student gathering historical data from charts for your thesis. You are a webmaster with visitor statistics charts and you want to do statistical analyses. You ride a bike or boat and want to know how much distance you covered in your last trip, but you do not have an odometer or GPS unit. However, you do have a map. Nice Features Automatic curve tracing of line plots Automatic point matching of point plots Automatic axes matching Automatic grid line removal for improved curve tracing Handles cartesian, polar, linear and logarithmic graphs Support for drag-and-drop and copy-and-paste makes data transfer fast and easy Image processing tools highlight data by removing grid lines and backgrounds Status bar suggestions guide beginners Context sensitive popup help windows reveal explain feature of the user interface Tutorials with pictures explain strategies for common operations Browser-based user manual is extensive yet easy to navigate Preview windows give immediate feedback while modifying settings Dates and times are imported with the Date/Time Converter Import support for common image file formats such as BMP, GIF, JPEG, PNG and XPM Export support for common software packages such as Microsoft Excel, OpenOffice CALC, gnuplot, gnumeric, MATLAB and Mathematica Engauge is available for a wide variety of platforms (Linux, Mac OSX, Windows) Engauge Digitizer is completely open source and free courtesy of Sourceforge, Trolltech and FFTW
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              SymPy is a Python library for symbolic mathematics. It aims to become a full-featured computer algebra system (CAS) while keeping the code as simple as possible in order to be comprehensible and easily extensible. SymPy is written entirely in Python and does not require any external libraries.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              This library is written in Modelica. The purpose of this library is to calculate fluid properties from an equation of state (EoS), directly within Modelica and not from an external dll. It supports EoS of the form f=f(T,d) meaning Helmholtz energy as a funtion of temperature and density. In addition to all state properties, this library calculates viscosity, thermal conductivity and surface tension. So far, the fluids n-Butane, R134a and Isobutane are implemented, but not fully validated. The next fluids to be implemented are probably isopentane, propane, ammonia, CO2 and other possible working fluids for Organic-Rankine-Cycles.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              bitbucket is a hosting site for the distributed version control systems (DVCS) Git and Mercurial. The service offering includes an issue tracker and wiki, as well as integration with a number of popular services such as Basecamp, Flowdock and Twitter.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              This is the website for the Pro Git book, written by Scott Chacon and published by Apress. Here you can find the full content of the book, a blog with tips and updates about Git and the book and open source projects related to Git or referenced in the book.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              This page describes the features of the SVG Rasterizer utility that comes with the Batik distribution. The SVG Rasterizer is a utility that can convert SVG files to a raster format. The tool can convert individual files or sets of files, making it easy to convert entire directories of SVG files. The provided formats are JPEG, PNG and TIFF, however the design allows new formats to be added easily. In addition, the rasterizer can (despite its name) transcode to PDF.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              The GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is a numerical library for C and C++ programmers. It is free software under the GNU General Public License. The library provides a wide range of mathematical routines such as random number generators, special functions and least-squares fitting. There are over 1000 functions in total with an extensive test suite. The complete range of subject areas covered by the library includes, Complex Numbers Roots of Polynomials Special Functions Vectors and Matrices Permutations Sorting BLAS Support Linear Algebra Eigensystems Fast Fourier Transforms Quadrature Random Numbers Quasi-Random Sequences Random Distributions Statistics Histograms N-Tuples Monte Carlo Integration Simulated Annealing Differential Equations Interpolation Numerical Differentiation Chebyshev Approximation Series Acceleration Discrete Hankel Transforms Root-Finding Minimization Least-Squares Fitting Physical Constants IEEE Floating-Point Discrete Wavelet Transforms Basis splines Unlike the licenses of proprietary numerical libraries the license of GSL does not restrict scientific cooperation. It allows you to share your programs freely with others.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              Computers & Chemical Engineering is primarily a journal of record for new developments in the application of computing and systems technology to chemical engineering problems. Several major areas of study are represented in the journal, including: •Modeling, numerical analysis and simulation •Mathematical programming (optimization) •Cyberinfrastructure, informatics and intelligent systems •Process and product synthesis/design •Process dynamics, control and monitoring •Abnormal events management and process safety •Plant operations, integration, planning/scheduling and supply chain •Enterprise-wide management and technology-driven policy making •Domain applications (molecular, biological, pharmaceutical, food, energy, and environmental systems engineering) Also, general papers on process systems engineering are welcome as well as emerging new areas and topics not covered above. Articles published cover different aspects of the application of process systems engineering to one or more of the general areas listed above, including new applications of established methods, comparisons of alternative methodologies, descriptions of state-of-the-art industrial applications and significant developments in computing targeted at training/education. Reports of software implementation must feature novel uses of state-of-the-art computing technologies. Computers & Chemical Engineering publishes full-length articles, perspective papers, journal reviews, short notes and letters to the editor.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              Modelon offers Modelica-based solutions for a range of industries and applications. Our unique expertise is consulted by customers all over the world.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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              MinGW, a contraction of "Minimalist GNU for Windows", is a minimalist development environment for native Microsoft Windows applications. MinGW provides a complete Open Source programming tool set which is suitable for the development of native MS-Windows applications, and which do not depend on any 3rd-party C-Runtime DLLs. (It does depend on a number of DLLs provided by Microsoft themselves, as components of the operating system; most notable among these is MSVCRT.DLL, the Microsoft C runtime library. Additionally, threaded applications must ship with a freely distributable thread support DLL, provided as part of MinGW itself). MinGW compilers provide access to the functionality of the Microsoft C runtime and some language-specific runtimes. MinGW, being Minimalist, does not, and never will, attempt to provide a POSIX runtime environment for POSIX application deployment on MS-Windows. If you want POSIX application deployment on this platform, please consider Cygwin instead. Primarily intended for use by developers working on the native MS-Windows platform, but also available for cross-hosted use, (see note below -- you may need to follow the "read more" link to see it), MinGW includes: A port of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC), including C, C++, ADA and Fortran compilers; GNU Binutils for Windows (assembler, linker, archive manager) A graphical and a command-line installer for MinGW and MSYS deployment on MS-Windows MSYS, a contraction of "Minimal SYStem", is a Bourne Shell command line interpreter system. Offered as an alternative to Microsoft's cmd.exe, this provides a general purpose command line environment, which is particularly suited to use with MinGW, for porting of many Open Source applications to the MS-Windows platform; a light-weight fork of Cygwin-1.3, it includes a small selection of Unix tools, chosen to facilitate that objective, and using it is a necessary prerequisite for building mingwPORTs. mingwPORTs are user contributed additions to the MinGW software collection. Rather than providing these "add-ons" as precompiled binary packages, they are supplied in the form of interactive Bourne shell scripts, which guide the end user through the process of automatically downloading and patching original source code, then building and installing it. Users who wish to build any application from a mingwPORT must first install both MinGW and MSYS.
              6 years ago by @thorade
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            publications  27