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    he A* (pronounced A-star) algorithm can be complicated for beginners. While there are many articles on the web that explain A*, most are written for people who understand the basics already. This article is for the true beginner. This article does not try to be the definitive work on the subject. Instead it describes the fundamentals and prepares you to go out and read all of those other materials and understand what they are talking about. Finally, this article is not program-specific. You should be able to adapt what's here to any computer language. As you might expect, however, I have included a link to a sample program at the end of this article. The sample package contains two versions: one in C++ and one in Blitz Basic.
    8 years ago by @draganigajic
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    The problem we're trying to solve is to get a game object from the starting point to a goal. Pathfinding addresses the problem of finding a good path from the starting point to the goal―avoiding obstacles, avoiding enemies, and minimizing costs (fuel, time, distance, equipment, money, etc.). Movement addresses the problem of taking a path and moving along it. It's possible to spend your efforts on only one of these. At one extreme, a sophisticated pathfinder coupled with a trivial movement algorithm would find a path when the object begins to move and the object would follow that path, oblivious to everything else. At the other extreme, a movement-only system would not look ahead to find a path (instead, the initial "path" would be a straight line), but instead take one step at a time, considering the local environment at every point. Best results are achieved by using both pathfinding and movement algorithms.
    8 years ago by @draganigajic
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