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    The date is fast approaching when students will receive their college acceptances from the most competitive colleges in the country. Most students have already heard from several colleges as all but the most competitive let students know much earlier than the beginning of April. Only 3% of the four-year colleges and universities in the United States accept fewer than 25% of their applicants and these schools enroll fewer than 4% of all new freshmen. This is a very small group of students and schools but the publicity surrounding these schools has lead many people to think that it is impossible to get into college and has resulted in great angst among students and parents about the college admissions process. On the other hand, 18% of the four-year institutions and all of the more than 1,000 community colleges in the U.S. are open admissions which means they have minimal admissions criteria and accept almost all students who apply if they have graduated from high school and complete all the required paperwork. Why do we have such misperceptions about getting into college? Too many people think that all schools are like the Ivies and the Little Ivies but that is far from true. There is a school for everyone and, in most cases, many schools that will be a good match for you. It is quite easy to predict your chances of getting in to a school as most schools accept all students who meet their stated criteria and have scores that are close to the school’s average scores. There are very few schools who have the luxury of turning away qualified students who meet their criteria. The very selective schools are able to fill their freshmen class many times over from their applicant pool while most others struggle to fill their class and find that they have to discount their tuition significantly to get the number of students that they need to operate in a financially viable way. The average discount rate at private four-year colleges is almost 50% meaning that on average students will pay only half of the published tuition
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The NCAA is an organization full of hypocrisies. It rakes in billions of dollars, but says there’s no money to pay the student-athletes. It works overtime to appease high-dollar corporate sponsors, but won’t let a star basketball player accept any perks. It routinely looks the other way when it comes to abuse scandals, and marginalizes its female athletes, all while running commercials focused on safety and equality.
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Khalsa University, established by disintegrating 125-year-old Khalsa College, is ready for its first full-fledged academic session a fortnight after Captain Amarinder Singh, who had vowed not to allow it, took over as the chief minister of Punjab. On February 17, 2016, Amarinder Singh had famously barged into the Khalsa College campus and declared that after becoming the CM, he would undo any attempts to set up Khalsa University on the 330 acres land of Khalsa College. However, though Amarinder has now become the CM, the Khalsa College management seems unruffled. Khalsa College Governing Council (KCGC) honorary secretary and Khalsa University Pro-Chancellor Rajinder Mohan Singh Chhina said, “It will have no impact on us. Captain Amarinder Singh is a very wise man. These were all talks before the elections. Khalsa University is constituted by passing a Bill in Punjab Assembly in September 2016. I don’t think Captain Amarinder Singh will have any problem with it.” Asked if the university administration will try to clear air by meeting the new chief minster, Chhina said, “We don’t have to. There is no such issue to discuss.” Chhina had unsuccessfully contested the Amritsar Lok Sabha bypoll on a BJP ticket in February this year. Despite the fact that his daughter-in-law Harsimrat Kaur Badal’s father Satyajit Singh Majithia has been the president of KCGC, former CM Parkash Singh Badal had avoided to establish Khalsa University during his first term of 2007 to 2012 due to huge protests against this move from different quarters of the Sikh community. Many Sikh bodies had claimed that Khalsa College was raised with the donation of community and should not be converted into a private university. KCGC then came up with an amended proposal to disintegrate Khalsa College to create a private university. Badal gave nod to the university only during the last Assembly session (in September 2017) of his 2012-2017 tenure as the chief minister amid protests from Congress and AAP. It did not give much time to university to start all
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The University of Costa Rica (UCR) climbed 30 spots in the “QS World University Rankings” for the 2016-2017 period. The QS World University Rankings provides an index of the world’s leading higher education institutions, based on six performance indicators: Academic reputation, Employer reputation, Student-to-faculty ratio, Citations per faculty, International faculty ratio and international student ratio; In this way the ranking evaluates performance in four areas: research, teaching, employability and internationalization, each indicator carries a different weighting when calculating overall scores; in this last edition the ranking was expanded to feature 916 universities (25 more than in the previous year) in 81 countries, following assessment of more than 3,800 institutions. The academic institution was ranked in the previous edition in the range 501-510 and this year it appears in the range 471-480, within the best 500 universities in the world. When it comes to the QS World University Rankings by subject, the University of Costa Rica got its best scoring in Agriculture & Foresty earning a position in the range 201-250. Within the Latin America University Rankings, the UCR holds position 18; in these region the best ranked was the Buenos Aires University (Argentina) which is in position 85 of the global ranking, being the only Latin America University to make the top 100. Brazil’s Sao Paulo University (120), Mexico’s UNAM (128), Chile’s UC (147), Brazil’s Unicamp (191) and the University of Chile (200), are all within the best 200 universities in the world. The top spot was earned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for fifth consecutive year, followed by Stanford University which climbed one place, Harvard University is in the third position while it used to lead the ranking from 2004-2009, the University of Cambridge is holding the fourth place and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) completes the top 5. The University of Oxford, University College London, the Swiss Federal
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Are there no Indian universities with potential for competing with the best in the world? And if the answer is yes, then what’s holding them back from becoming truly world-class?” These and similar questions would be answered at the Association of Indian Universities (AIU) conference on Internationalisation of Higher Education 2017, being hosted at Symbiosis International University (SIU)’s Lavale Campus from April 8 to 10. The three-day conference would be inaugurated by Union HRD Minister Prakash Javadekar and attended by over 100 vice-chancellors from Indian universities, both public and private, besides senior academicians, policy advisors, educational agencies and university representatives from the US, Europe, Asian countries like Singapore, Malaysia, Japan. The organisers said that through this conference they planned to present a policy paper to Javadekar on the roadmap to making Indian universities world-class. Amongst the prominent speakers at the conference include Prof Ellen Hazelkorn, policy advisor to Higher Education Authority (Ireland); Prof Philip Altbach, director, Center for International Higher Education (USA); Prof Bertil Andersson, president, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Prof Jamil Salmi, global tertiary education expert; besides UGC chairman Ved Prakash, D S Chauhan, president, AIU, D P Singh, director, NAAC. “Recently, the Indian government had announced that they will be selecting 10 public and 10 private universities to develop them into world-class universities and it is a very good decision. But what are the parameters that make a university world-class? Is research the core parameter, or does developing infrastructure suffice to make it amongst the best in the world? While the Indian government will work towards making these 20 universities world-class but how do others work towards making their varsities also amongst the best in the world. For this, we need to have dialogue and collaborations with world-class universities abroad. Hence we have organised this conferen
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Autocrats dislike independent, internationally-oriented, autonomous universities free of corruption and hence, they attack them. In order to add the appearance of legitimacy to purely political actions, autocratic regimes use the law to advance their goals. That is why their favorite strategy is to work through the legislature and courts. This seems to be the case with the European University at St. Petersburg and the Central European University in Budapest, both currently being harassed by the ruling political regimes. The European University at St. Petersburg is a private university, founded in 1994 by the Committee for Real Estate Management of St. Petersburg City Government, St. Petersburg Institute for Economics and Mathematics at the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg branch of Sociology Institute at the Russian Academy of Sciences, and St. Petersburg Association of Scholars with support from the MacArthur, Ford and Soros Foundations. Organizations funded by George Soros, through the Open Society Foundation, were expelled from Russia in 2015. This is no surprise, since authoritarian regimes fear democratic initiatives and do not share the idea of civil society that is promoted by George Soros. Russia’s Federal Agency for Supervision in Education and Science says that the university’s political science and sociology departments do not have a sufficient number of full-time faculty who do applied research, and that faculty on fixed-term employment contracts are not properly certified. Quite a few other minor violations, including missing a fitness center, are cited as well. While the university administration works on addressing these issues, the state agency continues its offensive. The European University at St. Petersburg has lost its state license and accreditation and may well lose its historic building, the Small Marble Palace. It turns out that the university installed new plastic windows in parts of the old building, and it goes against the city’s historical preservation ordinance. Russian Pr
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The future of thousands of medical students may hang in the balance, as the Medical Council of India (MCI) has started taking action against private medical colleges. These colleges are believed to have illegally admitted students in Under Graduate Courses by ignoring the National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET). Students must pass this test before they can gain admission to any medical college. Keeping a tab on the admission process to ensure that all admissions were being done through clearing NEET, the MCI has recently issued a discharge notice of at least 36 students admitted in Ponnaiyah Ramajayam Institute of Medical Sciences, Manamai-Nellur, Tamil Nadu. The students did not appear for the NEET exam but still were given admission in the college. “Our monitoring committee is keeping a strict vigil on admissions in all the medical colleges. We haven’t yet found out the exact numbers of students who were admitted without appearing in NEET. But we are aware that there are several medical colleges who have provided back door admissions by ignoring the NEET exam. Such admissions will not be considered,” said Dr Jayshree Mehta, President, MCI. Similarly, the Dental Council of India (DCI) is also scrutinizing admissions in dental colleges. “It has come to our notice that in states such as Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh some dental colleges have taken students without NEET. We are under a process of scrutinizing the list of admissions. We will take appropriate action against the erring colleges once we find out the exact number of students admitted illegally,” said Dr A K Chandna, member, DCI. Through NEET, the government is aiming to bring in more transparency in the admission process and curb the practice of capitation fee charged by private colleges. Also, common counselling for admission to all Undergraduate and Postgraduate Courses (Diploma/MD/ MS/DM/M.Ch.) in all medical educational institutions on the basis of merit list of the NEET has been introduced by the Union Health Ministry to curb malpractices
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Finishing an engineering project does not require knowledge but money. At least that’s the case in a few colleges in the city. Most of the students have been found resorting to buying readymade projects from small firms who are into this business full-time. These firms also help in getting research papers published for students. Some of these firms have even taken the route of e-commerce and have displayed the projects on their website in detail according to the technology it is based on, its price along with pictures, abstracts and research papers. Engineering students are expected to put the concepts that they learn into practice twice in their four-year long course –once in the third year as a mini project for 50 marks and again in their final year for 200 marks. However, majority of the students buy readymade projects which can cost anywhere between Rs 2,500 to Rs 50,000 depending on the technology, components used and complexity of the project. When contacted, JNTU-Hyderabad registrar, Dr N Yadaiah, said, “The university cannot ensure that at each and every affiliated college, students are genuinely doing the projects. The colleges also share this responsibility and should take required measures for it.” Private colleges in cahoots with project vendors While the university says that the onus is on private colleges, unfortunately these colleges are also involved with students in making a mockery of engineering education for earning a quick buck. A senior professor of a well-known engineering college said, “In many private engineering colleges, the teachers and Heads of Department provide business to firms selling engineering projects. They take commission on the cost that the students pay to such firms for buying projects. Not just this, but some college managements too are involved in this business by setting tie-ups with firms selling engineering projects. When the time comes for external evaluation, even invigilators are handled by the college management. It does not usually happen that some student i
    a year ago by @prophe
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    As the Trump administration tries to roll back education regulations, one city is attempting to stay a move ahead by fortifying its own protections for some college students. The Milwaukee Common Council unanimously passed legislation last week to prohibit financial assistance to for-profit institutions unless they meet federal financial aid regulations. The legislation, which updates a previous rule, means the city won’t provide monetary aid to for-profits or to related development projects if the involved colleges fail to meet federal financial aid regulations that were in force on Jan. 1, 2017, before Trump's inauguration. “Considering the leadership change at the federal level and who is now over the Education Department and her relationship with private for-profit colleges, it was thought that the federal guidelines could change, and our ordinance was predicated on what the federal guidelines were at that time,” said Alderwoman Milele Coggs, who sponsored the legislation. “So if those guidelines change, it doesn’t affect the standard we set as a city for education.” Coggs said Milwaukee has a right to be concerned about the types of education institutions that want to do business there. The original ordinance was put into effect following the 2009 arrival of Everest College, which received development money from the city. “We had major reservations about them coming in here, and we put them through the paces and [made them] jump through a series of hoops to demonstrate they could be successful in serving students,” said David Dies, executive secretary of the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board, the state’s for-profit oversight agency. Coggs said she and other residents in the city also had reservations about Everest. But the institution eventually opened its doors with the help of $11 million in bonds from the city’s redevelopment authority, she said. It wasn’t too long after Everest opened that the EAB noticed problems. “They only operated here about 18 months, and early on we started sensing issues based
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Are you in search of the cheapest private university in Nigeria? If it is so, this article is written exactly for you. Read on! Even if you have lack of money, ignorance isn't the way out. Education is very important not only for your self-satisfaction and self-respect, but also for finding well-paid job that will bring you pleasure and money. What are the terms of studying in private university in Nigeria? A great number of people choose for their studies private universities because the admission is much easier if to compare with state or federal universities. Nigeria private universities can welcome you if your score received during Unified Tertiary Matriculation Exam is below minimum. If you want to enter some state or federal university, the needed minimum number of scores shouldn't be below 200. IMPORTANT! Bear in mind that not all Nigeria most cheap private universities can function on a legal basis under the confirmation of Nigerian Universities Commission. Read more: https://www.naij.com/1095881-cheapest-private-university-nigeria.html
    a year ago by @prophe
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    After clearing the way to set up a private self-financed university at Pune, the state government is set to seek the legislative nod for four more private universities. The state cabinet has cleared the decks for DSK School of Design, Symbiosis University (for skill development), Vishwakarma Institute of Technology (VIT) in Pune and Sanjay Ghodawat University (SGU) in Kolhapur, and will soon present the bill for Symbiosis University in the state legislature. All these institutes are likely to start functioning in the upcoming academic year. This includes Dr Vishwanath Karad MIT World Peace University at Kothrud in Pune which was approved in the legislative Assembly and is now waiting for the approval from legislative council. The universities can accommodate from 600 to 1,000 students each. Around three years after the government paved the way for private universities by enacting the Maharashtra Self-financed Universities Act, 2013, six such institutes have been established in the state. The recent move signals the government’s inclination to provide space for private entities in the education sector as they would provide additional opportunities to the students. State education minister Vinod Tawde said that the approvals for the five universities were pending since the tenure of the previous government. “The process for issuing a letter of intent [to the promoters of private universities] is quite stringent. We scrutinised the proposals and approved universities which had something unique to offer to the students,” he said. According to sources, the proposed DSK School of Design will offer courses in animation, arts and fine arts, whereas Symbiosis University will be a skill development institute. Similarly, SGU in Kolhapur has proposed to offer regular engineering courses while VIT will focus on programmes on alternate energy sources. An official from the state’s higher and technical education department said that the government is pushing for private investment in education as it feels that Maha
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Internationally, more students than ever are attending college. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of students in higher education globally more than doubled to 207 million, according to a paper (pdf) published by UNESCO, together with the International Institute for Educational Planning and the Global Education Monitoring Report. As government universities struggle to accommodate the swelling ranks of students, private colleges are burgeoning. The report found that enrolments in private colleges and universities account for 30% of all global enrolments. However, these private for-profit higher education institutions have been heavily criticized in some countries. In the US, a 2012 report found that some private institutions have higher than average tuition rates, recruit aggressively, have low student retention rates, high rates of loan default, and offer little job placement assistance. Reporting by ProPublica found that some private universities also employ deceptive marketing techniques with recruiters making false claims. As for-profit education companies face growing scrutiny and tightening regulation at home, many have looked overseas, particularly to Latin America, for growth. In 2015, over 60% of students in Brazil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Peru were enrolled in private institutions, and over 80% in Chile and Paraguay. “The government has had no choice but to work with the private sector,” Fernando Iunes, global head of investment banking for Brazil’s Itaú BBA, told the New York Times (paywall). “It cannot meet the demand on its own.” Attending a private university is less common in Asia, where private enrollments make up 36% on student enrolments on average. But their popularity is growing in countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand, according to the UNESCO report. US firm Laureate Education, which operates 70 institutions in 25 countries with more than 1 million students enrolled, is one company profiting from the global dearth of public universities. Th
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Local President of the Private Universities Association of Ghana (PUSAG) at the All Nations University College in Koforidua, Eastern Region has made a call on government to make them enjoy subventions as they also pay taxes. Addressing a gathering of the college’s management and the media to report on the performance of the College at the recent PUSAG,Ebenezer Appiah-Kubi lamented how private universities have to compete with public universities in the area of recruitment and retention of highly qualified faculty. “There is the non-ubiquitous lack of finances for expansion, research, inadequate infrastructure among others,” he noted, adding that “libraries are ill-resourced and laboratories are also acute”. He pointed out that the recent salary increment for government workers makes compensation packages in public universities more attractive than what most private universities can afford. “In well-endowed countries, [private] universities receive funding from a variety of sources including government agencies such as sponsorship, falls into contract, corporate agreement, gift endowment and royalties". However, he said, private universities in Ghana do not have access to these funding sources and have to rely mainly on internally generated funds (IGFs) and loans that attract abnormally high interest rates from banks. He said public universities, on the other hand, are subsidised by government and “we think it is good and natural for government to assist us”. “We think private universities should not be deprived of government intervention such as GETFund, state scholarship and research grants and even subsidize for infrastructure expansion.” All Nations University College was awarded overall best in the just-ended PUSAG Games held at Cape Coast in the Central Region after its students took medals in volleyball, football, athletics, among others. The Registrar, Andrian Ion, commended students for the laurels won.
    a year ago by @prophe
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    PESHAWAR: The district administration on Friday sealed 40 private educational institutions, mostly schools, in the upscale University Town locality of Peshawar over the nonconforming use of residential buildings. Around 140 nonconforming commercial entities have so far been sealed in the weeklong operation in the area in compliance with the orders of the Peshawar High Court. Though a case of the contempt petition is pending with the PHC for not implementing its earlier orders to stop commercial activities in the University Town, the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Assembly recently amended the relevant law and allowed commercial activities there for five years. However, the legislation needs the notification of the relevant rules for enforcement. Few years ago, the high court had declared the carrying out of commercial activities in residential areas of Hayatabad Township and University Town illegal. The judgment was upheld by the Supreme Court. In 2015, the high court again issued directives in that respect over the petitions filed by some local residents. Nazim says action taken in line with high court orders Few months ago, they again moved the court and filed contempt of court petition saying the said judgment had not been implemented. The commercial buildings sealed by the district administration, include educational institutions, health care centres, guesthouses, beauty parlours, hotels, banks, shops etc. The closed offices also include around 30 government offices. “The sealed educational institutions will remain closed until further orders in light of the court’s directions,” an official in the district administration told Dawn. He said the court’s orders to seal commercial buildings in University Town were still valid even after legislation by the provincial assembly in that respect. “We have yet to receive any instruction from high-ups on the changes to the law about commercial activity in residential areas,” he said. The official said hearing into the contempt of court petition over nonconforming use
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The private sector has been called upon to support efforts to create skills and capacity in Africa to contribute to Africa’s transformation and economic growth. At the recent fourth World Bank’s Partnership for Skills in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology, or PASET, forum in Nairobi, the World Bank Group’s Vice-President for Human Development Keith Hansen said the private sector should expand its support for skills-building in Africa, with both resources and technology. The forum was organised by the World Bank and the Kenyan government from 5-7 April. It was attended by 19 African countries, including education and higher education ministers, and key partners such as South Korea, China, Brazil and Malaysia, which share knowledge and technical assistance with PASET's African members. “Links between education and industry are crucial, and Germany, Singapore, Korea and China all offer know-how around forging these links,” said Hansen. Private sector firms that attended included Microsoft, the State Grid Corporation of China and Philips. According to Hansen, PASET reflects two key World Bank Group priorities: “Our commitment to Africa, and to investing in people.” Human capital The World Bank invests in people because it is the right thing to do, and because people are an often untapped engine of inclusive economic growth, he said. Human capital is integral to ending poverty, explaining up to two-thirds of income differences between countries across the world. “To strengthen human capital in Africa, we need to achieve the right skills mix for young people. It is fantastic to see partners and governments converge around PASET, because there is no smarter shortcut to a bright future than education – when it is high-quality and relevant.” He noted that a critical mass of expertise and institutions that drive scientific and technological advancement in key sectors such as agriculture, energy, manufacturing, construction, ICTs and health also help sustain economic growth and boost resilience. “
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The acting Vice-Chancellor, Elizade University, Ilara -Mokin , Ondo State, Professor Theophileus Oyeyemi Fadayemi , has appealed to the Federal Government to allow private universities to benefit from the Tertiary Education Trust (TET Fund) grants . Fadayemi made the appeal made at a press conference which was held at the university campus on Friday in preparation for the school’s 1st convocation ceremony. The VC said such intervention from the Federal Government would help in manpower development in private universities across the country. While noting that Education Trust Fund was set up by the Federal Government to assist the development of the Nigerian Higher Education System, decried a situation whereby it is only government-owned universities are allowed to accessed the funds “We appealed to the Federal Government to allow private universities to benefit from TETfUND which has been restricted to Federal universities. The private universities that are ready to go into research should be able to have access to TETfUND. “We have all the capacity here at Elizade University in terms of our commitment .What we are asking for is that they should give us access to TETFUND. ” Fadayemi said a total of 35 out of 64 students that was admitted as first set of students of the university on January 6,2013 ,will be graduating at the convocation. He said that five students had first class honours while 17 and 13 had second class upper division, second class lower division respectively. The VC also said all courses the school runs are fully accredited. “The 17 programmes presented for NUC ‘s accreditation with all the 17 having full accreditation status. ” he said.
    a year ago by @prophe
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    Jaipur, Apr 20: A group of Kashmiri students at a private university in Rajasthan were on Wednesday allegedly called “terrorists” and beaten up by locals, upset over soldiers being targeted by stone-throwers in the strife-torn border state. The assault is the latest incident of violence against Kashmiris studying at Chittorgarh’s Mewar University, which has around 500 students from Jammu and Kashmir. “Six of us were assaulted in three separate attacks that took place at the same time in the market. The attacks seemed coordinated,” said Bahar Ahmed Giri, a student of pharmacy. Though no one suffered serious injuries, students are upset with the university administration for failing to protect them and have demanded the arrest of the offenders. They were beaten up for no reason, Giri said. “They hurled abuses, called us terrorists and said we throw stones at the army. They told us to go back to Kashmir and threatened that they won’t let us study here,” he said. Police have registered an FIR against two unknown people for causing hurt but gave a different version of events. Two Kashmiri students had an argument with two motorcycle-borne men in the market over giving way, local station house officer Dinesh said. “The two men hit the students and the students, too, retaliated,” he said. The university, too, backed police’s version. “A little scuffle happened between the students and the outsiders. There is nothing serious,” university director Harish Gurnani said. The locals even reached the hospital where students were being treated and abused them in the presence of police, Waseem Khan, who studies computer science, said. “Police did not do anything. They say that the locals did not harm us. Will they act when the locals kill one or two of us?” he said. In March 2016, four Kashmiri students were beaten up over rumours of beef being cooked in the university hostel. The following month, some Kashmiri students got into a scuffle with another group over India’s loss to West Indies in the T20 cricket world cup. Sixteen K
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The Department of English at University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh (ULAB) organises its Inter-University Students’ Conference and Cultural Competition for the third time. The two-day event began today at the ULAB auditorium commemorating the 200th death anniversary of British novelist Jane Austen and will end tomorrow, April 22, 2017, according to a release. The event is featuring students’ paper presentations on the first day and cultural competition on the second day. Students from 14 public and private universities, including Dhaka University, North South University, BRAC University, East West University, and ULAB, are participating in the event. Professor Fakrul Alam of Dhaka University, Professor Kamaluddin Ahmed of Chittagong University and Professor Mobasshera Khanam of National University were the judges of the academic papers on the first day of the event. Renowned actress Suborna Mustafa and Professor Sudip Chakraborty of Theatre and Performance Studies department of Dhaka University will be the judges of the cultural competition to be held on the second day of the event. Professor Emeritus Serajul Islam Chowdhury of Dhaka University attended the opening ceremony of the programme as the chief guest, while the Country Director of British Council Barbara Wickham will be attending the closing ceremony as the chief guest, the release read.
    a year ago by @prophe
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    The national tone of public criticism of higher education has sharpened recently. Many in both the public and private sectors are questioning the cost of higher education, and others are questioning its value. We are being exposed through all forms of media to predominantly negative stories about higher education. As one whose life was transformed by my collegiate experience, and now as a college president, I am a bold and proud apologist for higher education, its value and its necessity to the future of our country and the global economy. With deference to a 2017 report from the Association of Governing Boards entitled “The Business of Higher Education,” I share some facts about the economic benefits of higher education. A generation ago, a high school graduate earned 77 percent of what a college graduate earned. Today, for millennials, high school graduates will earn 66 percent of their college graduate neighbors. Over a lifetime, that is well over $1 million in additional earning for the college graduate, making the financial value proposition a good one. However, beyond earning potential, the recent study cited other equally important benefits for college graduates: “Higher education…efficiently creates human capital that improves communities and contributes to the economic well-being of the nation over the course of graduates’ entire lives. College graduates enjoy better health, longer lives, and greater degrees of individual and professional satisfaction. … They also use the skills learned in college to foster democracy and human rights, as well as to accelerate technological advancement.” We have witnessed recent debate within the West Virginia state legislature, as well as in many other state legislatures, concerning appropriations for public higher education. I am a supporter of both a robust public and private higher education sector, and recognize through empirical research, that investing public funds in all types of education is prudent and wise. I offer food for thought concerning the value
    a year ago by @prophe
     
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