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    Are you in search of the cheapest private university in Nigeria? If it is so, this article is written exactly for you. Read on! Even if you have lack of money, ignorance isn't the way out. Education is very important not only for your self-satisfaction and self-respect, but also for finding well-paid job that will bring you pleasure and money. What are the terms of studying in private university in Nigeria? A great number of people choose for their studies private universities because the admission is much easier if to compare with state or federal universities. Nigeria private universities can welcome you if your score received during Unified Tertiary Matriculation Exam is below minimum. If you want to enter some state or federal university, the needed minimum number of scores shouldn't be below 200. IMPORTANT! Bear in mind that not all Nigeria most cheap private universities can function on a legal basis under the confirmation of Nigerian Universities Commission. Read more: https://www.naij.com/1095881-cheapest-private-university-nigeria.html
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    After clearing the way to set up a private self-financed university at Pune, the state government is set to seek the legislative nod for four more private universities. The state cabinet has cleared the decks for DSK School of Design, Symbiosis University (for skill development), Vishwakarma Institute of Technology (VIT) in Pune and Sanjay Ghodawat University (SGU) in Kolhapur, and will soon present the bill for Symbiosis University in the state legislature. All these institutes are likely to start functioning in the upcoming academic year. This includes Dr Vishwanath Karad MIT World Peace University at Kothrud in Pune which was approved in the legislative Assembly and is now waiting for the approval from legislative council. The universities can accommodate from 600 to 1,000 students each. Around three years after the government paved the way for private universities by enacting the Maharashtra Self-financed Universities Act, 2013, six such institutes have been established in the state. The recent move signals the government’s inclination to provide space for private entities in the education sector as they would provide additional opportunities to the students. State education minister Vinod Tawde said that the approvals for the five universities were pending since the tenure of the previous government. “The process for issuing a letter of intent [to the promoters of private universities] is quite stringent. We scrutinised the proposals and approved universities which had something unique to offer to the students,” he said. According to sources, the proposed DSK School of Design will offer courses in animation, arts and fine arts, whereas Symbiosis University will be a skill development institute. Similarly, SGU in Kolhapur has proposed to offer regular engineering courses while VIT will focus on programmes on alternate energy sources. An official from the state’s higher and technical education department said that the government is pushing for private investment in education as it feels that Maha
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Internationally, more students than ever are attending college. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of students in higher education globally more than doubled to 207 million, according to a paper (pdf) published by UNESCO, together with the International Institute for Educational Planning and the Global Education Monitoring Report. As government universities struggle to accommodate the swelling ranks of students, private colleges are burgeoning. The report found that enrolments in private colleges and universities account for 30% of all global enrolments. However, these private for-profit higher education institutions have been heavily criticized in some countries. In the US, a 2012 report found that some private institutions have higher than average tuition rates, recruit aggressively, have low student retention rates, high rates of loan default, and offer little job placement assistance. Reporting by ProPublica found that some private universities also employ deceptive marketing techniques with recruiters making false claims. As for-profit education companies face growing scrutiny and tightening regulation at home, many have looked overseas, particularly to Latin America, for growth. In 2015, over 60% of students in Brazil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Peru were enrolled in private institutions, and over 80% in Chile and Paraguay. “The government has had no choice but to work with the private sector,” Fernando Iunes, global head of investment banking for Brazil’s Itaú BBA, told the New York Times (paywall). “It cannot meet the demand on its own.” Attending a private university is less common in Asia, where private enrollments make up 36% on student enrolments on average. But their popularity is growing in countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand, according to the UNESCO report. US firm Laureate Education, which operates 70 institutions in 25 countries with more than 1 million students enrolled, is one company profiting from the global dearth of public universities. Th
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Local President of the Private Universities Association of Ghana (PUSAG) at the All Nations University College in Koforidua, Eastern Region has made a call on government to make them enjoy subventions as they also pay taxes. Addressing a gathering of the college’s management and the media to report on the performance of the College at the recent PUSAG,Ebenezer Appiah-Kubi lamented how private universities have to compete with public universities in the area of recruitment and retention of highly qualified faculty. “There is the non-ubiquitous lack of finances for expansion, research, inadequate infrastructure among others,” he noted, adding that “libraries are ill-resourced and laboratories are also acute”. He pointed out that the recent salary increment for government workers makes compensation packages in public universities more attractive than what most private universities can afford. “In well-endowed countries, [private] universities receive funding from a variety of sources including government agencies such as sponsorship, falls into contract, corporate agreement, gift endowment and royalties". However, he said, private universities in Ghana do not have access to these funding sources and have to rely mainly on internally generated funds (IGFs) and loans that attract abnormally high interest rates from banks. He said public universities, on the other hand, are subsidised by government and “we think it is good and natural for government to assist us”. “We think private universities should not be deprived of government intervention such as GETFund, state scholarship and research grants and even subsidize for infrastructure expansion.” All Nations University College was awarded overall best in the just-ended PUSAG Games held at Cape Coast in the Central Region after its students took medals in volleyball, football, athletics, among others. The Registrar, Andrian Ion, commended students for the laurels won.
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    PESHAWAR: The district administration on Friday sealed 40 private educational institutions, mostly schools, in the upscale University Town locality of Peshawar over the nonconforming use of residential buildings. Around 140 nonconforming commercial entities have so far been sealed in the weeklong operation in the area in compliance with the orders of the Peshawar High Court. Though a case of the contempt petition is pending with the PHC for not implementing its earlier orders to stop commercial activities in the University Town, the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Assembly recently amended the relevant law and allowed commercial activities there for five years. However, the legislation needs the notification of the relevant rules for enforcement. Few years ago, the high court had declared the carrying out of commercial activities in residential areas of Hayatabad Township and University Town illegal. The judgment was upheld by the Supreme Court. In 2015, the high court again issued directives in that respect over the petitions filed by some local residents. Nazim says action taken in line with high court orders Few months ago, they again moved the court and filed contempt of court petition saying the said judgment had not been implemented. The commercial buildings sealed by the district administration, include educational institutions, health care centres, guesthouses, beauty parlours, hotels, banks, shops etc. The closed offices also include around 30 government offices. “The sealed educational institutions will remain closed until further orders in light of the court’s directions,” an official in the district administration told Dawn. He said the court’s orders to seal commercial buildings in University Town were still valid even after legislation by the provincial assembly in that respect. “We have yet to receive any instruction from high-ups on the changes to the law about commercial activity in residential areas,” he said. The official said hearing into the contempt of court petition over nonconforming use
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    If you are thinking about attending college and are tempted to take advantage of New York State’s new “free tuition” program, you may want to pay very close attention to the facts. First, students who opt for the state plan will be subject to a number of burdensome restrictions. They will be required to maintain 30 credit hours a year, earn a grade point average sufficient for on-time graduation, and agree to live and work in New York upon graduation for as many as four years. Failure to maintain 30 credits will make the student ineligible for future payments, and failure to reside in the state will convert the grant into a loan (and the terms of such loans have not been determined yet). By Gary A. Olson If you are thinking about attending college and are tempted to take advantage of New York State’s new “free tuition” program, you may want to pay very close attention to the facts. First, students who opt for the state plan will be subject to a number of burdensome restrictions. They will be required to maintain 30 credit hours a year, earn a grade point average sufficient for on-time graduation, and agree to live and work in New York upon graduation for as many as four years. Failure to maintain 30 credits will make the student ineligible for future payments, and failure to reside in the state will convert the grant into a loan (and the terms of such loans have not been determined yet). Advertisement What’s more, the state has made no guarantee that every eligible student will in fact receive this benefit. The state has allocated funding for only about 3 percent of the eligible population of college students. This means that most eligible students will not receive the benefit. And, of course, state college fees and room and board expenses are notoriously expensive and are not covered by the new grant. An old adage sums it up concisely: If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Or perhaps I was thinking of another familiar saying, “There’s no such thing as a free lunch.” In
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Americans are often expected to have some level of higher education before they enter the workforce. These political leaders are asking: Shouldn’t government help them along? CHICAGO—A surge of innovation in states and cities is building momentum for what could become a seismic shift in American education. Just as the country came to expect in the decades around World War II that young people would finish at least 12 years of school, more local governments are now working to ensure that students complete at least 14 years. With that change, political leaders in both parties are increasingly acknowledging that if society routinely expects students to obtain at least two years of schooling past high school, government has a responsibility to provide it for them cost-free. That impulse animates the statewide tuition-free community-college program pioneered under Republican Governor Bill Haslam in Tennessee and replicated under Democratic Governor Kate Brown in Oregon; Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s Star Scholarship, which funds two years of community college for students who complete high school with a B average; and the legislation Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed into law providing tuition-free access to two- and four-year public colleges in New York for families earning up to $125,000. The Campaign for Free College Tuition, an organization promoting this movement, expects representatives from up to 18 states to join their conference next month in Denver. Ben Cannon, executive director of the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission, speaks for many devising these initiatives when he insists: “As a state, we generally acknowledge and understand that a high-school education is not enough, and [tuition-free community college] represents an attempt to extend that [public-education] entitlement to 14 years.”
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    More than 20% of higher education courses run by Thai universities fail to meet required standards, according to the Office of the Auditor General (OAG). According to Isara News Agency, the OAG recently...
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Educators have called on the government to pay more attention to research as only 10 Thai universities made it on the Times Higher Education top 300 Asia University Rankings this year, and six out of the universities' rankings slipped from last year.
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    You can now study Mechatronics (a combination of mechanical and electrical engineering) at the private TeamLease University in Baroda. ITM Skills Academy now has a year-long postgraduate programme in Aadhar housing finance. Liberal Arts subjects are compulsory if you’re doing a BTech or BBA at the Great Lakes International University, Sri City. Free to frame their own course structures and syllabi, private universities are thinking out of the box, offering courses and combinations that are based on today’s industry needs rather than on templates set in the 1990s. This means niche specialisations, tie-ups with industry for apprenticeships and updated subject pairings. “Interacting with Indian engineers abroad, I learned that they cannot socialise and adapt to different cultures as well as they should be able to, because there is a huge gap in their knowledge of cultural binders such as art and films and often a lack of ability to communicate as well,” says Parag Diwan, founder and chancellor of GLIU. “So we have made it compulsory for tech and management students to take at least eight courses in liberal arts subjects such as art appreciation and film appreciation throughout the four-year course tenure.” There’s a realisation that the ‘one size fits all’ approach doesn’t work anymore, says educational entrepreneur Sudhanshu Sinhal, founder of the Sinhal coaching classes. “Students too want their learning experience to fit their lifestyle; it must be relevant, collaborative, personalised, engaging, and accessible.” For private universities, this kind of innovation on campus is easier because they are not governed by authorities that resist change, adds Dhiraj Mathur, partner (Education) at PwC India. “They also have better interaction with industry and are funded well, so they are able to provide personalised, tailor-made courses — at a cost, of course.” For students who can afford it, this is good news. Parth Shah, 23, for instance, says he picked mechatronics at TeamLease because he was excited by the c
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    States could save money and increase college-graduation rates by providing modest financial incentives for students to choose private colleges over comparable public ones, according to a report released this week. The conclusion, which was quickly disputed by a group representing public colleges, comes at a time when a growing number of states are providing the opposite incentives. This week New York became the first state to offer free tuition at both two- and four-year public colleges for middle-class families. Other states are considering similar moves, prompting widespread concern that enrollments could plunge at some tuition-dependent private colleges that recruit heavily from their states. The report was prepared for the Council of Independent Colleges as part of its efforts to promote the value of the liberal arts and independent colleges. The report was distributed this week to all of the council’s members, to provide talking points when they make the case for financial support from state lawmakers, especially in states where free public-college tuition is on the agenda. It’s hardly surprising that the council, which represents more than 700 nonprofit independent colleges, would promote a report based on the argument that costs per degree are lower and graduation rates higher at private institutions. But the report’s authors, both of whom work at public universities, say it is based on a comprehensive analysis of federal data and state-specific simulations in 24 states. In all but two of those states, the proposed shift would save money, the researchers concluded. The findings were dismissed by Barmak Nassirian, director of federal relations and policy analysis for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. "I empathize with their plight, and I don’t begrudge them their moment in the sun, if that’s what their report is, but there are lots of problems with it," he said in an interview on Thursday. "They’re trying to make the counterintuitive case that expensive schools are cheaper t
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Girls who finished year 12 at a private school are most likely to go to university, as the gap between independent, Catholic and government school students who go on to higher education widens to its highest level in recent years. Private school students were nearly 15 per cent more likely to go to university in 2016 than students at Catholic schools, and nearly 24 per cent more likely than government school students, according to a new report by the Australian National University on what NSW secondary students go on to do after leaving school. The growing gap can be attributed to the number of Catholic students going to university falling significantly from 62.5 per cent in 2015 to 53.9 per cent in 2016. At the same time, the number of private school students going to university grew from 64.3 per cent to 68.7 per cent.
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    New York's private colleges and universities don't know what to expect under the state's free tuition program for students attending public colleges. New York’s freshly signed free public tuition program puts the squeeze on many of the state’s weakest private colleges and universities. Private college presidents know it. But most aren’t yet sure what to do about it. Those presidents reacted with a mix of dismay, confusion, criticism and, in some cases, resolve in the days after New York leaders struck a deal to start a tuition-free public college program this fall. The creation of a program in New York caps a winding and unexpected path for the free-college idea, which New York Governor Andrew Cuomo proposed early this year after it appeared to have died with Hillary Clinton’s presidential bid. Cuomo held a ceremonial bill signing for the program Wednesday, which Clinton attended. The program, called the Excelsior Scholarship, will allow New York residents from families earning up to $125,000 per year to attend the state’s public community colleges and four-year colleges without paying tuition. It will go into effect this fall for students who are newly enrolling at institutions in the State University of New York and City University of New York systems and who come from families with incomes of up to $100,000 per year. The income limit will jump to $110,000 in fall 2018 and $125,000 in 2019. Cuomo’s office estimates that about 940,000 families in the state will be eligible at that point. The program poses a significant challenge for New York’s many small private institutions, which suddenly find themselves facing a new kind of competition and increasing inter-sector warfare in the state. The pressure will be highest on tuition-dependent colleges and universities that already compete for students in part by heavily discounting their tuition and that draw most of their students from inside the state. More prestigious colleges and universities, which pull in more students from out of state and are more selecti
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    As financial difficulties take their toll, more mergers like that between UCL and the Institute of Education look inevitable – or will private equity firms step in? hen academics at the Institute of Education were told that they would be merging with University College London, they were assured it would boost their profile. The IoE was already ranked as world-leading in education. But in a climate of squeezed research funding and highly competitive student recruitment, the merger was seen as a sensible move by many in the sector, who felt that smaller institutions might be at risk. The alliance crowned UCL as the biggest university in London, with more than 35,000 students, and the largest postgraduate institution in Britain. But two years on, angry educationists say they are underpaid and undervalued in their new institution. Last month John Yandell, president of the IoE branch of the University and College Union, delivered a petition signed by 1,000 staff and students to UCL’s provost, Michael Arthur, calling for a rise in London weighting to match their UCL counterparts – IoE academics claim they are paid £600 less. He believes members struggle to cope with the high rent, mortgage and travel costs of living in the capital. But he isn’t optimistic about their chances of being heard. With some modern universities suffering declines of up to 25% in student numbers, experts say an increase in university mergers is inevitable. “The main driver will be that some institutions will become financially unsustainable – if they aren’t already,” says Prof Roger Brown, former vice-chancellor of Southampton Solent University. Glynne Stanfield, head of the international higher education practice at law firm Eversheds, who has advised on several university mergers, says lower-ranking institutions that are not meeting student-number targets may well look for a partner. But he argues another likely scenario is that struggling universities may be taken over by private sector players waiting in the wings. “Would the private s
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    JINAN, April 13 (Xinhua) -- The ruling Communist Party of China (CPC) piloted a program in Shandong Province by sending cadres to occupy senior positions in private universities to overhaul weak party building and ideological work. Unlike public universities, private schools generally do not have Party chiefs at the core of management, or any strong Party organizations. In the first part of the program, five cadres were assigned to head Party committees of Qilu Institute of Technology, Qingdao University of Technology and three other schools, according to the higher education commission under the CPC Shandong provincial committee. The cadres, all former Party chiefs or deputy chiefs in public universities, are to serve four years in their new posts. A second batch will be sent later this year, and all 40 private universities in the province will have Party chiefs by 2018. The authorities said the priority of these cadres was to improve party building and ideological and political work in private higher learning institutions. About 368,000 students study in Shandong's private universities. Huang Qi, deputy director of the higher education commission of CPC Shandong provincial committee, said the measure aimed to introduce the successful experience of public universities in party building and ideological and political work to private ones. He said unignorable problems existed in private universities' ideological education: there were not enough Party cells; supervision of the Party was sometimes loose; and ideological education remained weak. China's central leadership heightened the importance of college student political education in a high-profile meeting last year. The leadership pointed out that higher education must be guided by Marxism, and the Party's policies in education must be fully carried out. Students should be educated to be aware of the development trends of China and the world at large and should develop firm beliefs and confidence in communist ideals and socialism with Chinese character
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Universities are caught in a privatization trap that they built themselves and that will be difficult to take apart, argues Christopher Newfield. This country’s public universities face the Trump administration in a weakened condition. That is partly because they have suffered years of state funding cuts and still aren’t back to pre-2008 levels. But it’s also because they have long embraced a private-funding model that doesn’t work and whose weaknesses Trump and his people can exploit. A painful example is the proposed 18 percent cut to the National Institutes of Health, which Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price has contended would not hurt research, as it would mostly focus on cutting back on overhead expenses to universities. An 18 percent budget slash sounds catastrophic -- until you remember that companies take these kinds of hits and survive. So do American families, where illness or job loss lead to cuts far greater than that. The same goes for public universities: few have not had a cut on that scale sometime in the past 25 years, and still fewer have admitted that such losses hurt educational quality. Since universities survived the financial crisis with little damage -- that they have disclosed -- what would keep the citizenry awake at night about an 18 percent cut for medical research? Research directors reply that it would be terrible indeed: National Science Foundation Director France Cordova, for example, has said the proposed cuts endanger the economy, since “half of our present GDP is due to investments in science and technology.” Researchers have noted that the current funding austerity already appears in the form of the declining average success rate for grant applications, which has been cut nearly in half since 2001, from 27 percent to 16 percent. Four in five applications go unfunded, with presumably valuable results to medical knowledge possibly lost. Such arguments might work if voters thought science needed public funding to get to the public. But the unfortunate fact is that
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    A private North Carolina college is calling on faculty and staff to sign and live in accordance with a document that opposes same-sex marriage and abortion. One faculty member says she and eight of her colleagues have refused to sign it and are leaving. MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) — A private North Carolina Christian college is insisting that its faculty and staff sign a document that opposes same-sex marriage and abortion. One faculty member says she and eight of her colleagues have refused to sign it and are leaving the school. News media outlets report that part of Montreat College's "Community Life Covenant" expects those who work there to affirm "the sanctity of marriage between one man and one woman" and the "worth of every human being from conception to death." Covenant opponents blame the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, which contributed $100,000 to the college's scholarship fund last month. The fund is led by Franklin Graham, a Montreat College alumnus and an outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage and abortion. The association has denied any role in the covenant, however. School spokesman Adam Caress told The Charlotte Observer in an email that only two faculty members — one of its 39 full-time faculty and one of its 142 adjunct faculty — have cited the school's "core documents," including the covenant, as the reason they will not return to the school after this semester. Caress said Montreat College spent the past 2 1/2 years "reviewing and revising" those core documents in a "transparent and deliberative process" that included 13 "listening sessions," during which the school heard and responded to the concerns of faculty, staff, and alumni. Corrie Greene, an English teacher at the school who also directs its writing center, said the document doesn't just pertain to what faculty do and say in the classroom and on campus. She is among the nine faculty members who said they won't be returning. "It says we must affirm and uphold the college's specific spiritual stances in our full 24 hour/seven-day-a
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    Financial aid crucial to admitting low-income students Standing at the center of Union College’s campus last week, senior Andrew Guyatte recalled the moment he was accepted. It wasn’t a sure thing for Guyatte, and a lot rode on how much financial support the college would offer. “I wanted somewhere that was affordable to go; that was the main goal,” said Guyatte, who is part of the college’s Academic Opportunity Program, AOP, which targets financially-needy students who likely would not make it to Union without extra financial and academic support. “I knew I had the extracurriculars and grades to get in, but the money part was concerning ... If I didn’t get financial aid I wouldn’t be able to attend,” he said. When Guyatte, a Capital Region native, received his Union acceptance letter four years ago, it came with one condition and one big promise: Join the AOP program, commit to a five-week summer program before school starts and Union will cover tuition, room and board and books. Few of Guyatte’s classmates, especially outside of the roughly 120 AOP students across all years, come from families eligible for Pell grants – federal aid that goes to students like Guyatte from families that earn less than $50,000 a year – or even close. The median family income of a Union College student is $152,600, and two-thirds of students come from families in the top 20 percent of the income scale, according to a New York Times analysis of a study by The Equality of Opportunity Project, a collaboration of Stanford and Harvard researchers, released earlier this year. Just under 15 percent of Union students this year receive Pell grants, a widely-used proxy for socioeconomic status. The numbers are even starker at Skidmore: 13 percent of its student body this year received Pell grants. The college’s median family income topped $208,000 and 72 percent of the students come from families in the top 20 percent of income, according to the Times analysis. And Skidmore is the 38th of 38 colleges in the nation with more students fro
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    As the State System of Higher Education examines its operations and mulls its future, a Harrisburg-based think tank has issued a report that is part tribute and part warning.
    5 months ago by @prophe
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    A private college in Minnesota has denied the request of a student to create a rifle club because it goes against the school and its partner church's stance on gun control.
    5 months ago by @prophe
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