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    The date is fast approaching when students will receive their college acceptances from the most competitive colleges in the country. Most students have already heard from several colleges as all but the most competitive let students know much earlier than the beginning of April. Only 3% of the four-year colleges and universities in the United States accept fewer than 25% of their applicants and these schools enroll fewer than 4% of all new freshmen. This is a very small group of students and schools but the publicity surrounding these schools has lead many people to think that it is impossible to get into college and has resulted in great angst among students and parents about the college admissions process. On the other hand, 18% of the four-year institutions and all of the more than 1,000 community colleges in the U.S. are open admissions which means they have minimal admissions criteria and accept almost all students who apply if they have graduated from high school and complete all the required paperwork. Why do we have such misperceptions about getting into college? Too many people think that all schools are like the Ivies and the Little Ivies but that is far from true. There is a school for everyone and, in most cases, many schools that will be a good match for you. It is quite easy to predict your chances of getting in to a school as most schools accept all students who meet their stated criteria and have scores that are close to the school’s average scores. There are very few schools who have the luxury of turning away qualified students who meet their criteria. The very selective schools are able to fill their freshmen class many times over from their applicant pool while most others struggle to fill their class and find that they have to discount their tuition significantly to get the number of students that they need to operate in a financially viable way. The average discount rate at private four-year colleges is almost 50% meaning that on average students will pay only half of the published tuition
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The NCAA is an organization full of hypocrisies. It rakes in billions of dollars, but says there’s no money to pay the student-athletes. It works overtime to appease high-dollar corporate sponsors, but won’t let a star basketball player accept any perks. It routinely looks the other way when it comes to abuse scandals, and marginalizes its female athletes, all while running commercials focused on safety and equality.
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    Khalsa University, established by disintegrating 125-year-old Khalsa College, is ready for its first full-fledged academic session a fortnight after Captain Amarinder Singh, who had vowed not to allow it, took over as the chief minister of Punjab. On February 17, 2016, Amarinder Singh had famously barged into the Khalsa College campus and declared that after becoming the CM, he would undo any attempts to set up Khalsa University on the 330 acres land of Khalsa College. However, though Amarinder has now become the CM, the Khalsa College management seems unruffled. Khalsa College Governing Council (KCGC) honorary secretary and Khalsa University Pro-Chancellor Rajinder Mohan Singh Chhina said, “It will have no impact on us. Captain Amarinder Singh is a very wise man. These were all talks before the elections. Khalsa University is constituted by passing a Bill in Punjab Assembly in September 2016. I don’t think Captain Amarinder Singh will have any problem with it.” Asked if the university administration will try to clear air by meeting the new chief minster, Chhina said, “We don’t have to. There is no such issue to discuss.” Chhina had unsuccessfully contested the Amritsar Lok Sabha bypoll on a BJP ticket in February this year. Despite the fact that his daughter-in-law Harsimrat Kaur Badal’s father Satyajit Singh Majithia has been the president of KCGC, former CM Parkash Singh Badal had avoided to establish Khalsa University during his first term of 2007 to 2012 due to huge protests against this move from different quarters of the Sikh community. Many Sikh bodies had claimed that Khalsa College was raised with the donation of community and should not be converted into a private university. KCGC then came up with an amended proposal to disintegrate Khalsa College to create a private university. Badal gave nod to the university only during the last Assembly session (in September 2017) of his 2012-2017 tenure as the chief minister amid protests from Congress and AAP. It did not give much time to university to start all
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The University of Costa Rica (UCR) climbed 30 spots in the “QS World University Rankings” for the 2016-2017 period. The QS World University Rankings provides an index of the world’s leading higher education institutions, based on six performance indicators: Academic reputation, Employer reputation, Student-to-faculty ratio, Citations per faculty, International faculty ratio and international student ratio; In this way the ranking evaluates performance in four areas: research, teaching, employability and internationalization, each indicator carries a different weighting when calculating overall scores; in this last edition the ranking was expanded to feature 916 universities (25 more than in the previous year) in 81 countries, following assessment of more than 3,800 institutions. The academic institution was ranked in the previous edition in the range 501-510 and this year it appears in the range 471-480, within the best 500 universities in the world. When it comes to the QS World University Rankings by subject, the University of Costa Rica got its best scoring in Agriculture & Foresty earning a position in the range 201-250. Within the Latin America University Rankings, the UCR holds position 18; in these region the best ranked was the Buenos Aires University (Argentina) which is in position 85 of the global ranking, being the only Latin America University to make the top 100. Brazil’s Sao Paulo University (120), Mexico’s UNAM (128), Chile’s UC (147), Brazil’s Unicamp (191) and the University of Chile (200), are all within the best 200 universities in the world. The top spot was earned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for fifth consecutive year, followed by Stanford University which climbed one place, Harvard University is in the third position while it used to lead the ranking from 2004-2009, the University of Cambridge is holding the fourth place and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) completes the top 5. The University of Oxford, University College London, the Swiss Federal
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The acting Vice-Chancellor, Elizade University, Ilara -Mokin , Ondo State, Professor Theophileus Oyeyemi Fadayemi , has appealed to the Federal Government to allow private universities to benefit from the Tertiary Education Trust (TET Fund) grants . Fadayemi made the appeal made at a press conference which was held at the university campus on Friday in preparation for the school’s 1st convocation ceremony. The VC said such intervention from the Federal Government would help in manpower development in private universities across the country. While noting that Education Trust Fund was set up by the Federal Government to assist the development of the Nigerian Higher Education System, decried a situation whereby it is only government-owned universities are allowed to accessed the funds “We appealed to the Federal Government to allow private universities to benefit from TETfUND which has been restricted to Federal universities. The private universities that are ready to go into research should be able to have access to TETfUND. “We have all the capacity here at Elizade University in terms of our commitment .What we are asking for is that they should give us access to TETFUND. ” Fadayemi said a total of 35 out of 64 students that was admitted as first set of students of the university on January 6,2013 ,will be graduating at the convocation. He said that five students had first class honours while 17 and 13 had second class upper division, second class lower division respectively. The VC also said all courses the school runs are fully accredited. “The 17 programmes presented for NUC ‘s accreditation with all the 17 having full accreditation status. ” he said.
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    Jaipur, Apr 20: A group of Kashmiri students at a private university in Rajasthan were on Wednesday allegedly called “terrorists” and beaten up by locals, upset over soldiers being targeted by stone-throwers in the strife-torn border state. The assault is the latest incident of violence against Kashmiris studying at Chittorgarh’s Mewar University, which has around 500 students from Jammu and Kashmir. “Six of us were assaulted in three separate attacks that took place at the same time in the market. The attacks seemed coordinated,” said Bahar Ahmed Giri, a student of pharmacy. Though no one suffered serious injuries, students are upset with the university administration for failing to protect them and have demanded the arrest of the offenders. They were beaten up for no reason, Giri said. “They hurled abuses, called us terrorists and said we throw stones at the army. They told us to go back to Kashmir and threatened that they won’t let us study here,” he said. Police have registered an FIR against two unknown people for causing hurt but gave a different version of events. Two Kashmiri students had an argument with two motorcycle-borne men in the market over giving way, local station house officer Dinesh said. “The two men hit the students and the students, too, retaliated,” he said. The university, too, backed police’s version. “A little scuffle happened between the students and the outsiders. There is nothing serious,” university director Harish Gurnani said. The locals even reached the hospital where students were being treated and abused them in the presence of police, Waseem Khan, who studies computer science, said. “Police did not do anything. They say that the locals did not harm us. Will they act when the locals kill one or two of us?” he said. In March 2016, four Kashmiri students were beaten up over rumours of beef being cooked in the university hostel. The following month, some Kashmiri students got into a scuffle with another group over India’s loss to West Indies in the T20 cricket world cup. Sixteen K
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The Department of English at University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh (ULAB) organises its Inter-University Students’ Conference and Cultural Competition for the third time. The two-day event began today at the ULAB auditorium commemorating the 200th death anniversary of British novelist Jane Austen and will end tomorrow, April 22, 2017, according to a release. The event is featuring students’ paper presentations on the first day and cultural competition on the second day. Students from 14 public and private universities, including Dhaka University, North South University, BRAC University, East West University, and ULAB, are participating in the event. Professor Fakrul Alam of Dhaka University, Professor Kamaluddin Ahmed of Chittagong University and Professor Mobasshera Khanam of National University were the judges of the academic papers on the first day of the event. Renowned actress Suborna Mustafa and Professor Sudip Chakraborty of Theatre and Performance Studies department of Dhaka University will be the judges of the cultural competition to be held on the second day of the event. Professor Emeritus Serajul Islam Chowdhury of Dhaka University attended the opening ceremony of the programme as the chief guest, while the Country Director of British Council Barbara Wickham will be attending the closing ceremony as the chief guest, the release read.
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The national tone of public criticism of higher education has sharpened recently. Many in both the public and private sectors are questioning the cost of higher education, and others are questioning its value. We are being exposed through all forms of media to predominantly negative stories about higher education. As one whose life was transformed by my collegiate experience, and now as a college president, I am a bold and proud apologist for higher education, its value and its necessity to the future of our country and the global economy. With deference to a 2017 report from the Association of Governing Boards entitled “The Business of Higher Education,” I share some facts about the economic benefits of higher education. A generation ago, a high school graduate earned 77 percent of what a college graduate earned. Today, for millennials, high school graduates will earn 66 percent of their college graduate neighbors. Over a lifetime, that is well over $1 million in additional earning for the college graduate, making the financial value proposition a good one. However, beyond earning potential, the recent study cited other equally important benefits for college graduates: “Higher education…efficiently creates human capital that improves communities and contributes to the economic well-being of the nation over the course of graduates’ entire lives. College graduates enjoy better health, longer lives, and greater degrees of individual and professional satisfaction. … They also use the skills learned in college to foster democracy and human rights, as well as to accelerate technological advancement.” We have witnessed recent debate within the West Virginia state legislature, as well as in many other state legislatures, concerning appropriations for public higher education. I am a supporter of both a robust public and private higher education sector, and recognize through empirical research, that investing public funds in all types of education is prudent and wise. I offer food for thought concerning the value
    10 months ago by @prophe
     
      USAEnglishApr2017
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      Over the years I have seen many retirement plans ruined, simply because substantial amounts of investment dollars, originally allocated for retirement, were used to pay for college education. This selfless act of support can create a long-term problem for the retiree. However, it is not the act of paying for the education that is at issue but rather how and when you choose to pay is what needs to be explored. First, let's take a look at general college costs; according to collegedata.com the average cost of tuition and fees for the 2016–2017 school year was $9,650 for state residents at public colleges, $24,930 for out-of-state residents attending public universities and for those in private colleges the average was a whopping $33,480 a year. Add to that room and board, books and supplies, ancillary living expenses and possible travel costs needed for either the student or family members throughout a school year, and you have a hefty draw down of savings. –– ADVERTISEMENT –– Read: How to get into an Ivy League school — by someone who got into 6 of them For many, that lump sum draw down, each year over four years — potentially four plus years — will create significant, irreplaceable, long-term loss of reserves needed to support your future, ongoing monthly retirement income. To avoid diminishing your retirement savings or general investment accounts, be creative; explore the various options that may be available to pay for college. With that said, here are a few suggestions intended to help support higher education needs and at the same time designed to help keep your retirement savings intact: • Plan to have your child apply for scholarships. Discuss with your child, early on, what is required to be granted a scholarship. Visit with a school counselor to get information on the qualifying rules and learn what types of scholarships and student aid may be available. Remember; it is cheaper to pay for a summer tutor to help your child strengthen a subject they are weak in, than it is to forfeit a
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      CHANDIGARH: The Punjab government has decided to scrap the contentious Khalsa University Act that the previous Shiromani Akali Dal-BJP government had passed in September last year, just before assembly elections. The Act allowed Khalsa College Charitable Society, run by Satyajit Singh Majithia, father-in-law of former deputy chief minister Sukhbir Badal, to carve out a private university from the land belonging to the 125-year-old Khalsa College in Amritsar. The decision was taken at Wednesday's cabinet meeting chaired by chief minister Captain Amarinder Singh. . . This is Amarinder's third big decision overturning the previous government's pronouncements. He had first cancelled permits to a number of private bus companies, including those owned by Sukhbir. He had also removed halqa in-charges and ordered a third-party probe into the alleged Rs 12,000-crore foodgrain scam. . . According to Wednesday's cabinet note, the government will repeal the Act through an ordinance. The note cited four reasons for not letting a private university come up on the land including "damage to character and loss of heritage status of 125-year-old institution". . . "The Khalsa University (Repeal) Ordinance, 2017 aims to repeal the Khalas University Act, 2016 with a view to protect the heritage character of Khalsa College, Amritsar. The Khalsa College, Amritsar has over a period of time become a significant icon of Khalsa heritage and the decision for the university taken in 2016 is likely to shadow and damage its character and pristine glory," the note states. .
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      Lynn University will hold the ground breaking for its $35 million student center on Thursday, April 20. The 65,000-square-foot project will be the largest ever undertaken by the non-profit university in Boca Raton. The ceremony will start at 11 a.m. at 3601 N. Military Trail. The event is by invitation only. Lynn University received a $15 million challenge grant for the project from Christine E. Lynn, who owns a local insurance business. It has named the student center after her.
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      OSKALOOSA — William Penn University, like many other private colleges in the state, continues to find unique ways to attract Iowa students. They’ve invested in their curriculum, made the programs more flexible with daytime, evening and nontraditional classes and focused on developing the campus culture to be a meaningful, purposeful experience. To celebrate William Penn University’s legacy of educational opportunities, they’re offering a new scholarship to Iowa high school seniors enrolling in traditional coursework at the Oskaloosa campus. If eligible, the student will pay $5,000 or less for tuition for the 2017-18 school year.
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      HARRISBURG – This may be a growing trend in Pennsylvania: private colleges and universities are doing something to bring back students and families scared away by the sky-high cost of higher education. In some cases, tuition plus room and board can cost $50,000, $60,000, even $70,000 a year. As a result, enrollment is down. “Sticker shock is an issue. In fact, some research suggests 60 percent of parents and students will rule out a school based on just the price,” said Don Francis of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania. To get students back on campus, private schools are either slashing or freezing tuition. Immaculata University near Philadelphia is reducing tuition from $34,400 to $26,500 a year. At LaSalle, tuition is down from $40,400 to $28,800, and Rosemont College on the Main Line reduced tuition to $18,500 from $31,500. Rosemont also knocked $1,900 off room and board. Other schools like Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, Manor College, Wilson College in Chambersburg, and the Pennsylvania Institute of Technology have decided to freeze tuition. It appears to be working. Many of the schools report enrollment numbers are going up. After Rosemont cut tuition and room and board, applications soared by 64 percent and actual enrollment jumped by nearly 15 percent. The AICUP also launched the “Just Apply” campaign. The message: students just don’t know what the college will offer unless they apply. “Many students will discover if they apply to private institutions that institution will cost maybe less, maybe the same, and maybe slightly more than a public institution,” Francis said.
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      While very few people study poetry or classics to get rich, studying the humanities has a big financial payoff at a surprising array of colleges, a new analysis of college grads’ earnings has found. Of course, students who major in engineering, economics, business or computer science at the best schools tend to have the highest financial return on their tuition investments, according to new salary data collected by PayScale.com. But liberal arts and other humanities majors at 16 schools have, on average, earned at least $500,000 more than they paid for school and the typical earnings of someone who did not attend college, PayScale said. Humanities majors at 245 colleges have typically earned at least $200,000 more than they spent on college within 20 years of graduation, PayScale found. Leading the pack: Yale. PayScale estimates that Yalies who receive financial aid pay a total of only about $80,000 for their four-year degrees. And, on average, people whose education stopped at high school earn about $30,000 a year. Yale humanities majors report earning about $80,000 a year, on average. So 20 years out, Yalies have earned a total of about $1.6 million, which puts them a total of $812,000 ahead of high-school grads - even after subtracting the cost of school. Making these numbers even more impressive: they’re only for students who finished their education with a bachelor’s. They don’t count, for example, history majors who went on to earn law degrees or M.B.As. Ivy League colleges, which offer generous aid and thus have low costs for middle class families, tend to have among the highest “return on investment” for humanities and many other majors, PayScale found. But many more accessible colleges also paid off well: Wabash College, a private men’s college in Crawfordsville, Ind. that accepts 61% of applicants, ranked in the top 20 for financial return for a humanities degree. After 20 years, the typical Wabash humanities grad had earned a financial return of about $500,000. San Jose State University, had one
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      Private universities and colleges have an important role in the massive expansion of higher education in India in the last two decades. According to latest official statistics, there are 777 universities in India. Of these around 261 are private universities. Among the 38498 colleges, more than 77% are in the private sector. They cater to 67% of the total higher education enrolment in the country. However, not enough discussions are happening in the country about the status and role, especially the social impact, of these institutions. Recently, Pritam Singh, former director of the prestigious public business school Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, made an important observation about the state of private business schools in India: While certain private institutes have managed to break away from the stereotypes attached and emerged as quality Institutes, there are still several problems plaguing the private sector today. The most important one is that owners of private colleges consider them to be businesses rather than educational institutes. More importance is put on infrastructure rather than research work and the quality of faculty is bad. Quality faculty is not willing to take up such jobs because such institutes don’t pay well or give their teachers autonomy and freedom for research. Similarly, eminent Indian journalist T.J.S George had recently brought the pathetic state of certain private professional institutions in the country into public attention through his weekly column in the Indian Express. He questioned not only the commercialisation of education but also the institutional culture in private institutions by citing a recent incident happened in South India in which the chairman of an engineering college was hacked to death by a gang armed with sickles. This brutal incident was the culmination of a long-running gang war. George raised a very pertinent question in his column: what have people of this kind got to do with colleges of engineering and stuff? In India, the majority of private
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      Purdue University’s plan to buy for-profit Kaplan University to expand its reach is the latest twist on an old idea: boost enrollment by attracting students online.
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      Granting autonomy to colleges will ensure that the public good that is higher education, will become a private business. ‘Autonomy’ is the new buzzword echoing in the halls of higher education today. The word conveys high and cherished ideals like independence, freedom, self-reliance, self-determination – all of which are now being invoked, by various authorities, inside and outside the government, to rationalise and justify the newfound urgency with which a select few colleges are being ‘invited’ to ‘apply’ for autonomy. Why then has this become controversial? For one, the University Grants Commission (UGC) in its ‘Guidelines for Autonomous Colleges During the XII Plan‘ (2012) had stipulated that only colleges that were awarded a least a B-Grade by the National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC), three times, over at least ten years could be considered for autonomy. It had also stipulated that the staff of the college should be ‘involved in the thinking and planning processes from the very beginning’. None of this has happened, but ‘autonomy’ has now become a juggernaut, barrelling on, unstoppably. The ‘autonomy’ that is being planned will benefit only the various private trusts that now ‘manage’ the colleges in question – not the faculty, nor the non-teaching staff, nor the students, and certainly not their parents. The terms of autonomy are such that the administrative and financial powers and control of the private trusts will subsequently increase dramatically, de facto, and possibly de jure. The checks and balances that exist by virtue of being affiliated to the university will gradually disappear completely. For instance, faculty service conditions: these are supposed to remain unchanged but, in real terms, the obligation of the trusts to honour these conditions is greatly reduced ‘post-autonomously’. Why? Because the current financial and administrative accountability of the college trusts to the university authorities will disappear completely with ‘autonomy’, and consequently, so will employ
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      NEW DELHI: As many as 122 private engineering colleges have opted for "progressive closure" since last year. Most of these colleges are in Maharasthra, Gujarat and Haryana. If a college goes for "progressive closure" in an academic year, it means the institution cannot admit students anymore. However, the students of the previous batches continue their studies till the completion of their courses. According to statistics available with the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), the country's technical education regulator, 23 engineering colleges in Pune, Nagpur, Aurangabad, Jalgaon and Kohlapur and other areas of Maharashtra closed down during the 2016-17 session. "Failing to survive, private engineering colleges either seek progressive closure to ultimately shut down or turn into polytechnic or science and art colleges. "Since the best lot of students takes admission in prestigious colleges like IITs and NITs and other centrally funded institutions, others left in the fray settle for private colleges. The low number of enrolments make it difficult for institutions to survive," a senior AICTE official said. Fifteen engineering colleges in Gujarat, seven in Telangana, 11 in Karnataka, 12 in Uttar Pradesh, six in Punjab, 11 in Rajasthan and 13 in Haryana closed down during the period. Only one technical college from the national capital opted for closure.
      10 months ago by @prophe
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      JAIPUR: The technical education sector in the state is facing a bleak future with large number of faculty positions in the government aided engineering colleges remaining vacant which adversely affecting the quality of education in these colleges. In nine engineering colleges, out of 1,080 sanctioned posts of teaching facility, only 590 are now in existence. This means 46% of the total sanctioned post of teaching faculty is vacant. Similar, is the case with non-teaching staff. Out of the total sanctioned post of 1096 non-teaching staff, only 658 are now working while over 40 % of the sanctioned posts are lying vacant. These nine Engineering colleges in consideration are the Government Engineering College Ajmer; Government Women's Engineering College Ajmer; Government engineering college Bikaner; CET Bikaner; Government Engineering college Jhalawar; MLVT Bhilwara; MLVT Bhilwara; Government Engineering college Banswara ; Government Engineering college Bharatpur and RTU Kota. These government aided engineering colleges are generally the next preference of students after the high profile IITs and NITs as students prefer government aided colleges over private ones. The reason for this is the presence of experienced faculty. However things are not looking good for these colleges either with students preferring to migrate to reputed private colleges in the South due to the lethargy of the college administration and the government inability to put the functioning of these colleges in order. Sources in the Higher education department said these government aided engineering colleges are autonomous bodies. Each college had a board of governors and the principal of the college is the member secretary. Secretary technical education is also a member of the board of governors. He said the government role is limited to providing land, building and other infrastructure and the day today administration like faculty positions are to be decided by the college administration. They have to find money for new appointment similar to th
      10 months ago by @prophe
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