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    A private North Carolina college is calling on faculty and staff to sign and live in accordance with a document that opposes same-sex marriage and abortion. One faculty member says she and eight of her colleagues have refused to sign it and are leaving. MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) — A private North Carolina Christian college is insisting that its faculty and staff sign a document that opposes same-sex marriage and abortion. One faculty member says she and eight of her colleagues have refused to sign it and are leaving the school. News media outlets report that part of Montreat College's "Community Life Covenant" expects those who work there to affirm "the sanctity of marriage between one man and one woman" and the "worth of every human being from conception to death." Covenant opponents blame the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, which contributed $100,000 to the college's scholarship fund last month. The fund is led by Franklin Graham, a Montreat College alumnus and an outspoken opponent of same-sex marriage and abortion. The association has denied any role in the covenant, however. School spokesman Adam Caress told The Charlotte Observer in an email that only two faculty members — one of its 39 full-time faculty and one of its 142 adjunct faculty — have cited the school's "core documents," including the covenant, as the reason they will not return to the school after this semester. Caress said Montreat College spent the past 2 1/2 years "reviewing and revising" those core documents in a "transparent and deliberative process" that included 13 "listening sessions," during which the school heard and responded to the concerns of faculty, staff, and alumni. Corrie Greene, an English teacher at the school who also directs its writing center, said the document doesn't just pertain to what faculty do and say in the classroom and on campus. She is among the nine faculty members who said they won't be returning. "It says we must affirm and uphold the college's specific spiritual stances in our full 24 hour/seven-day-a
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Financial aid crucial to admitting low-income students Standing at the center of Union College’s campus last week, senior Andrew Guyatte recalled the moment he was accepted. It wasn’t a sure thing for Guyatte, and a lot rode on how much financial support the college would offer. “I wanted somewhere that was affordable to go; that was the main goal,” said Guyatte, who is part of the college’s Academic Opportunity Program, AOP, which targets financially-needy students who likely would not make it to Union without extra financial and academic support. “I knew I had the extracurriculars and grades to get in, but the money part was concerning ... If I didn’t get financial aid I wouldn’t be able to attend,” he said. When Guyatte, a Capital Region native, received his Union acceptance letter four years ago, it came with one condition and one big promise: Join the AOP program, commit to a five-week summer program before school starts and Union will cover tuition, room and board and books. Few of Guyatte’s classmates, especially outside of the roughly 120 AOP students across all years, come from families eligible for Pell grants – federal aid that goes to students like Guyatte from families that earn less than $50,000 a year – or even close. The median family income of a Union College student is $152,600, and two-thirds of students come from families in the top 20 percent of the income scale, according to a New York Times analysis of a study by The Equality of Opportunity Project, a collaboration of Stanford and Harvard researchers, released earlier this year. Just under 15 percent of Union students this year receive Pell grants, a widely-used proxy for socioeconomic status. The numbers are even starker at Skidmore: 13 percent of its student body this year received Pell grants. The college’s median family income topped $208,000 and 72 percent of the students come from families in the top 20 percent of income, according to the Times analysis. And Skidmore is the 38th of 38 colleges in the nation with more students fro
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    As the State System of Higher Education examines its operations and mulls its future, a Harrisburg-based think tank has issued a report that is part tribute and part warning.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    A private college in Minnesota has denied the request of a student to create a rifle club because it goes against the school and its partner church's stance on gun control.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    HYDERABAD: Continuing their protest against private colleges, hundreds of junior doctors and postgraduate students, on Friday, took out rallies in front of Gandhi, Osmania, and Pulse hospitals demanding that the government strikes off the fee hike proposal floated by private medical colleges. The protesters claimed that hiking the fee would go that hiking the fee would go against the government's motto of providing free and quality education to everyone. "If I pay about Rs30 lakh for a PG seat, obviously I will try to and recover that money by heavily charging the common more for providing treatment.So, in the long run, this move will only affect the common public," said Dr Kaushik, representative of PG medical aspirants. He urged the government to de-recognise these colleges if they can't operate by charging the current fee. While a final decision on the contentious issue is likely to be taken within the next two or three days, doctors and medical students fear that the move will have an adverse impact on poor students, in case Rsthe government bows under the pressure' of private hospitals. "The protests will continue till the government rejects the proposal of the private colleges," said Dr G Srinivas, president, Telangana Sta te Junior Doctors Association. The proposal drafted by private medical college managements seeks a three-fold increase in the fee for convenor quota seats. There are about 350 such seats in 700 private medical colleges in the state that are filled by the state government on merit basis. Until last year, the convenor quote fee was Rs3.2 lakh per annum.In case of a hike, this will be revised to Rs9-12 lakh annually . College managements, meanwhile, maintained that they cannot run colleges on the current fee owing to increasing costs.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Governor Cuomo gave a press release on April 8 announcing the new Excelsior Program, which would offer free tuition to all New York State universities (SUNY) and colleges (CUNY) for low-income residents. The recently approved program makes New York the first state to offer free tuition in any form. Cuomo argued, “Today, college is what high school was—it should always be an option even if you can’t afford it. The Excelsior Scholarship will make college accessible to thousands of working and middle class students and shows the difference that government can make.” The press release announces a newly approved budget for education that offers “a record $7.5 billion in total support for higher education, a $448 million, or 6.3 percent, increase over last year.” In addition to a free tuition, the funding will go towards increased resources for TAP, ‘Get On Your Feet’ Loan Forgiveness Program, and an $8 million allocation for open education resources for SUNY and CUNY students. The Higher Education Service Corporation (HESC) states the requirements plainly on its website. “If you are a NYS resident whose family household adjusted gross income does not exceed $100,000 for the 2017-18 academic year and you complete 30 credits per year, you will be able to attend a SUNY or CUNY college tuition free.” In future years the cap for family income will increase. The following year will include families with a gross income of up to $110,000. From 2019 and beyond a family earning up to $125,000 can qualify. Students already enrolled in a SUNY or CUNY institution can also benefit from the new program. The intention behind the additional funding, according to its press release, is to work towards “alleviating crushing burden of student debt and placing more New Yorkers on path to financial security.” Of families who meet the economic standards, 80% are calculated to qualify for the program. Students who meet the monetary requirements must be consistently on track to graduate in four years with a passing grade point aver
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Indiana public higher education institution eyes for-profit online provider’s technological expertise A for-profit online university will be converted into a “non-profit, public-benefit” organisation under the terms of its acquisition by a US public university. Kaplan University – which is owned by Kaplan Inc, a subsidiary of the Graham Holdings Company – is to be purchased by Purdue University, a statement from the Indiana-based institution confirmed on 27 April. Under the sale’s conditions, Purdue University will take on Kaplan University’s 32,000 students, 3,000 staff and 15 campuses and learning centres. KU will become a new non-profit university, connected to Purdue and bearing a version of its name. A corporate filing by Graham Holdings Company stated that the transfer of assets would create a “new, non-profit, public-benefit corporation affiliated with Purdue…[which] will operate as a new Indiana public university…focused on expanding access to education for non-traditional adult learners”. Mitch Daniels, Purdue’s president, said that KU's expertise in delivering online education had been attractive. “None of us knows how fast or in what direction online higher education will evolve, but we know that its role will grow, and we intend that Purdue be positioned to be a leader as that happens,” he said. “A careful analysis made it clear that we are very ill-equipped to build the necessary capabilities ourselves, and that the smart course would be to acquire them if we could. We were able to find exactly what we were looking for.” The new institution, which will consist of the seven schools and colleges comprising KU – save for the School of Professional and Continuing Education – will have its own institutional accreditation and will be governed by its own board of trustees, which will “fully control” its functions. Purdue, which will appoint the members to the board of trustees, will provide “key non-academic operations support” to the new university for an initial 30 years, with a buyout option after
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    With a surprise deal to acquire the for-profit Kaplan University, announced on Thursday, Purdue University has leapfrogged into the thick of the competitive online-education market. Purdue plans to oversee the institution as a new piece of its public-university system — a free-standing arm that will cater to working adults and other nontraditional students. The purchase, conceived and executed in just five and a half months, puts Purdue in position to become a major force in an online landscape increasingly dominated by nonprofit institutions. Until now, said Purdue’s president, Mitch Daniels, the university "has basically been a spectator to this growth" in distance education, with just a few online graduate programs. Mr. Daniels, a former Republican governor of Indiana, described the acquisition as adding a "third dimension" to Purdue, along with its research-rich flagship in West Lafayette, Ind., and its regional campuses. For Kaplan and its parent company, Graham Holdings, the deal offers a potentially profitable exit strategy for an operation that has seen its bottom line battered for several years by falling enrollments. (Kaplan now has 32,000 students.) The contrast between the typical Purdue student and the military veterans, lower-income students, and members of minority groups who make up much of the enrollment at the open-access Kaplan is "stark," said Mr. Daniels. But he said the university has a responsibility to serve such students. Millions of Americans have some or no college credits, and Purdue can’t fulfill its land-grant mission "while ignoring a need so plainly in sight," he noted while unveiling the deal at a Board of Trustees meeting on Thursday. The potential financial upsides were also clearly a factor. In an interview with The Chronicle, Mr. Daniels said it was "too soon" to talk about revenue projections. "We have hope and reason for hope" that Purdue’s new acquisition will do well, he said, alluding to the fast pace of online growth at other nonprofit institutions, like Western Gover
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    The students framed their enrollment in a for-profit as having stemmed from a desire to gain confidence, reach their potential, take charge of their lives, and shed social labels associated with a lack of a college degree. ----- What leads more than 7 percent of the nation’s college students to enroll at for-profit institutions? Much of the discussion of higher education’ proprietary sector assumes that its member schools enroll students who are academically marginal and lack other options. That’s far too simplistic, a new study concludes. The study’s authors are two scholars from the University of Pittsburgh: Linda DeAngelo, an assistant professor of higher education, and Molly M. McClelland, a doctoral student in administrative and policy studies there. They based their analysis on extensive interviews with 19 students who had attended two-year, for-profit colleges before enrolling in a private, four-year, urban college. The students ranged in age from 20 to 60 and were diverse in terms of their race, ethnicity, gender, and major. Contrary to common stereotypes, the two researchers say, their subjects generally saw their experience with a for-profit college as positive, and said little that traced their decision to enroll in it to poor academic performance in high school. Generally, they framed their enrollment in a for-profit as having stemmed from a desire to gain confidence, reach their potential, take charge of their lives, and shed social labels associated with a lack of a college degree. In keeping with standard research protocol, the researchers name neither their subjects nor the private college where the study took place. They caution that their study’s results might have been skewed by its focus on students who were successful enough to move on to a four-year institution. The researchers also stress that their findings should not be perceived as an endorsement of the for-profit sector, which continues to have low graduation rates and includes colleges that leave students heavily indebted and faci
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Purdue University in Indiana announced plans Thursday to start a new online school by acquiring for-profit Kaplan University, one of the top destinations for military students and veterans. The unlikely relationship between a public land-grant university and a for-profit school stems from “mutual interests and goals” and a shared desire to expand access to education, according to the terms of the agreement between Purdue and Kaplan’s parent company, Graham Holdings. “None of us knows how fast or in what direction online higher education will evolve, but we know its role will grow, and we intend that Purdue be positioned to be a leader as that happens,” Purdue President Mitch Daniels said in a statement. “A careful analysis made it clear that we are very ill-equipped to build the necessary capabilities ourselves, and that the smart course would be to acquire them if we could. We were able to find exactly what we were looking for.” According to information provided by Purdue, the university’s feasibility studies indicated it would take 36 months to create a single degree program and much longer to create an online school of the magnitude it is acquiring with Kaplan. With Kaplan comes 32,000 students, 3,000 employees and 15 campuses and learning centers throughout the Midwest and East Coast that will fall under Purdue when the acquisition becomes official. The process could take several months, according to Kaplan Inc. spokesman Mark Harrad, as the U.S. Department of Education, state agencies and the institutions’ accreditor agencies still need to sign off. A Military Times analysis of fiscal year 2015 federal data show Kaplan Higher Education Corp. was the 11th most popular destination for active-duty service members using tuition assistance benefits and the 18th most popular school for Post-9/11 GI Bill users. That corporation consisted of Kaplan University, which Purdue acquired, as well as several smaller schools that are no longer part of the company and weren't part of the deal. But Kaplan University acc
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    A University of the Ozarks campaign to raise $55 million kicked off its public phase Friday, with endowed scholarships one of three funding priorities for the private, Presbyterian-affiliated school in Clarksville. This story is only available from the Arkansas Online archives. Stories can be purchased individually for $2.95. Click here to search for this story in the archives.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Rectors of three private universities in Armenia are accused of issuing false diplomas to foreign nationals, said Armenian National Security Service spokesman Samson Galstyan, APA reported citing Novosti Armenia. Of the three cases initiated, two have already been sent to court, noted Galstyan. “The investigation was carried out in an accelerated manner. In the third case, the investigation is nearing completion,” he said. Earlier it was reported that as a result of the large-scale investigative activities undertaken by Armenia’s National Security Service, cases of providing diplomas formed on the basis of false grounds by different private universities of Armenia have been uncovered. False diplomas have been issued not only to Armenian citizens, but also to foreign citizens, particularly to dozens of citizens from Iran, U.S., Georgia, Russia, Uzbekistan and Israel resulting to the risks of new violations of law and other adverse effects. As the source reports charges have been filed against the three rectors of the private universities for bribery and power abuse by an employee of a trading or other organization.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Traverse City — A local education nonprofit has sealed a deal to purchase a northwest Michigan elementary school, but operation-related details are still unclear and officials aren’t publicly discussing options.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    “It’s time for a new approach to building better relationships with policymakers. We need legislators from outside regent communities to be on the task force.” --------------------- OWA CITY — With state support for higher education floundering, and more tuition increases looming, several lawmakers say they support and would be involved in a Board of Regents-led task force focused on future tuition-setting practices and rates. During its April meeting last week in Council Bluffs, board members pitched the idea of forming a task force with “a wide representation of regent constituencies” that could meet this summer to have a discussion about tuition at the public universities. Outgoing board President Bruce Rastetter said the collaboration could address state priorities and help students and families plan. “The board has tried very hard in the last five years to get out in front to let legislators and parents know what our tuition increase would be if we get a certain amount of state support,” Rastetter said. “Clearly that went off the rails this year because of the Iowa economy. But there was also a difference in how Iowa funds education and how the regents system has been funded.” Board spokesman Josh Lehman said this week his office is developing a framework for such a group. At the meeting, Rastetter said that Iowa “really needs a holistic approach to whether it can afford all the education that it has — the pre-K-12, the community college system, the Iowa Tuition Grant program, and properly funding the regents.” Propelling the idea was a rough legislative session brought on by lower-than-expected state revenue growth. Lawmakers delivered body blows to the public universities — cutting $20.8 million from their base general education funding for the current year and further reducing base state appropriations in 2018. The cuts prompted regents last week to signal another tuition increase for fall — on top of the already approved 2 percent rise for resident undergraduates. Later this summer, the board cou
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Gov. Andrew Cuomo just took the first step in creating accessible college education statewide. On April 12, Cuomo signed legislation that will enact the first-in-the-nation Excelsior Scholarship program that will provide tuition-free college for both SUNY and CUNY institutions to middle-class families and those who might not have been able to afford it beforehand. Under this plan, families making under $125,000 yearly will qualify for tuition-free college, meaning that nearly 80 percent, or more than 940,000 families with college-aged children will be eligible. The plan, proposed by Cuomo back in January, has caught the attention and approval of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and former United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Sanders commended Cuomo for his efforts toward creating easily accessible higher education. “Every American, regardless of income, must have the right to a higher education,” Sanders said. “I congratulate Gov. Cuomo and New York State for helping to lead the nation in that direction.” A driving force behind the plan lies in the estimation of 3.5 million jobs in New York State requiring an associate’s degree or higher by the year 2024. The Excelsior Scholarship program will be implemented in phases over the next three years. Beginning in the fall of 2017, families making under $100,000 will be given the opportunity to apply to the program. Within the next year, the cap will be raised to $110,000 and to $125,000 in subsequent years. Despite its seemingly beneficial attributes, the governor’s plan has been met with skepticism. While the plan claims that 940,000 families would be eligible, the amount of families who would receive the benefits would be significantly less. According to The New York Times, the plan will not cover as many families as the governor hopes it will. By the time the plan is fully enacted in 2019, director of State Operations Jim Malatras believes it will only cover 200,000 families rather than the approximate million that had been originally estimated
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    In a move that has raised eyebrows with higher education experts, a well-regarded public university has forged a deal with a for-profit college. Purdue University announced Thursday that it has paid $1 up front to acquire assets from Kaplan University in an attempt to expand its offerings in online education targeted toward adult learners. Purdue President Mitch Daniels said at a Board of Trustees meeting Thursday that the Indiana university wants to be a leader as online education continues to grow, but that it wasn’t capable of doing that on its own. “Today’s agreement moves us from a standing start to a leading position,” Daniels said in a statement. Purdue will turn Kaplan into a yet-to-be-named new public university that will, for the time being, continue offering the same set of academic programs. Kaplan’s 3,000 employees will be transferred, as will its 32,000 students. Purdue says it will take over the academic side of the operation, while Kaplan will continue non-academic services, including marketing and student recruitment. The new university will be self-sufficient and run off of tuition revenue and fundraising. Students will pay Kaplan's existing tuition and fees, although Purdue said Indiana students may receive an in-state discount. Trouble-Plagued Industry While Kaplan has one of the stronger names in for-profit education, the industry has faced years of declining enrollment, heightened regulations, legal battles, and broad criticism for loading students up with debt and providing meaningless degrees. At Kaplan itself, enrollment fell 22% in 2016 and its revenue is down 40% from 2014, according to an annual report from Graham Holdings, which owns Kaplan. As David Halperin, a policy analyst who writes about for-profit colleges, points out in a piece on Huffington Post, Kaplan has been investigated by or settled cases -- some for more than $1 million -- with attorneys general in Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, as well as with the U.S. Departments of Education and Just
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    About 2,000 Kentucky students are eligible for debt relief after getting loans to take online classes through the for-profit Corinthian Colleges Inc., Attorney General Andy Beshear announced Thursday. In Kentucky, the company solicited students under the name Everest College and Everest University. Corinthian also marketed its WyoTech career training program throughout the state. Beshear’s office is notifying eligible students by letter of the cancellation of the federal student loans they used to attend Corinthian schools. Students whose federal loans are canceled will not have to make further payments on the loan and any payments made by the student will be refunded. “As attorney general, my mission is to protect Kentucky’s families from consumer fraud, especially the ongoing deception by for-profit colleges like Corinthian,” Beshear said. “We must do everything in our power to ensure eligible Kentucky students get all the debt relief from fraudulent Corinthian loans.” Federal and state investigators examined Corinthian’s job placement rates, alleging that the company falsified those rates between 2010 and 2014. Currently, Corinthian is not allowed to enroll students and is only remaining open to “teach out” current students. Beshear’s letter will go to Kentucky students who fall within the U.S. Department of Education’s findings of fraud concerning Corinthian, and who are eligible for a special “streamlined” process to discharge their federal student loans. Any student, however, who attended Corinthian Colleges or any other school and believes the school lied about job prospects, the transferability of credits or other issues may apply to have his or her federal student loans discharged using the Department of Education’s universal discharge application at https://borrowerdischarge.ed.gov. More information is available at https://studentaid.ed.gov/borrower-defense. Beshear said Kentucky and states across the country are keeping pressure on the federal government to honor their commitment to help student
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Turkey – Yeditepe University, a leading private university in Istanbul, Turkey, has received awards for all of its nine entries in ISIF’17 (the 2017 Istanbul International Inventions Fair), becoming the only institution to have all its entries honoured among all the institutions from all over the world that participated in the fair. As a testimony to Yeditepe’s commitment to innovation and inventiveness, the awards also showcased its already well-known image: a university with strong relations with the industry and the community. In addition to regular awards, Yeditepe was also honoured by TPE’s Best National Patent award for one of its entries. The Istanbul International Inventions Fair is an internationally renowned annual event hosted by TPE (Turkish Patent and Trademark Office) with international support from WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization), EPO (European Patent Office), and IFIA (International Federation of Inventors’ Association). A total of 389 patents of industrial and academic institutions from North America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East had been submitted to ISIF’17 that took place in March 2017 at Istanbul WOW Convention Center. The entries were judged by a panel of international jurors. Yeditepe University is one of the largest and most reputable private universities in Turkey, known for its strong programmes in engineering, social sciences and education, arts and sciences, law, dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, health sciences, fine arts, architecture, and, business and commerce. Offering most of its programmes in English at both undergraduate and graduate levels, Yeditepe also attracts a large number of international students from all over the world as well as Turkish students from all regions of Turkey, resulting in a quite diverse body of students.
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    Cardinal not wanted after his role in handling sex abuse allegations Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York since 2009, will speak at the University of St. Thomas' May commencement ceremony despite student calls for the university to reconsider. Students say they are concerned about Dolan's role in handling sexual abuse allegations when he was archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Milwaukee in the early 2000s. A petition calling for the private Montrose university to cancel the speech brought more than 100 signaturesin the last several days, and four students Thursday afternoon distributed leaflets from the heart of campus with photos of Dolan's face, media coverage of allegations against him and a link to an online petition. "Send it to everyone you know," said Victoria Villarreal, a senior studying communications, as she passed a flier to a woman. "I did," she responded. University President Robert Ivany said Thursday morning that he does not believe the criticism reflects general opinion on the 3,300-student campus. The university's governing board of directors selected Dolan to speak two years ago in a unanimous decision, he said. The university announced last week that he would speak at commencement. Before assuming his current role in New York, Dolan served as archbishop of Milwaukee from 2002 to 2009. Under his leadership, abusive priests were paid up to $20,000 for agreeing to be removed from the clergy. "Was it a payoff, was it a settlement, was it an impetus - I wouldn't say that, nor would I say it was a normal practice, but it was done," he said in a 2012 deposition about the payments. The payments, he said, were to help accused priests transition out of their positions and get medical insurance. Ordained as a priest in 1976, Dolan has served in Missouri, Washington, D.C., and Rome. He had a prominent role in President Donald Trump's inauguration, leading the nation in prayer from the Capitol moments before Trump took office. He was appoint
    8 months ago by @prophe
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    For-profit universities in the US have a record of aggressive marketing practices, poor completion rates, and producing graduates with uncertain job prospects and high levels of debt. So why would Purdue University, a state university in Indiana founded in 1869, buy Kaplan University, a for-profit institution with a record of federal investigations and lawsuits from former students? Purdue is eager to offer online education, and acquiring Kaplan was cheaper that building a new system form scratch, Purdue president Mitch Daniels said in a statement. The school doesn’t have to pay anything upfront, and “will enter into a long-term transition and support agreement, with a buy-out option after year six,” according to a FAQ page. For-profit universities in the US have a record of aggressive marketing practices, poor completion rates, and producing graduates with uncertain job prospects and high levels of debt. So why would Purdue University, a state university in Indiana founded in 1869, buy Kaplan University, a for-profit institution with a record of federal investigations and lawsuits from former students? Purdue is eager to offer online education, and acquiring Kaplan was cheaper that building a new system form scratch, Purdue president Mitch Daniels said in a statement. The school doesn’t have to pay anything upfront, and “will enter into a long-term transition and support agreement, with a buy-out option after year six,” according to a FAQ page. Public universities have been forced to become more entrepreneurial as states have dramatically cut funding. It’s no surprise that Daniels, the former Republican governor of Indiana who slashed the state’s higher-ed budget, would be pushing Purdue to find new sources of revenue. Still, it’s an unexpected turn in American higher education, with a market-driven disruptor swallowed by the stodgy old incumbents. But it may be that the for-profit executives just misread the market signals: Students, it seems, didn’t just want convenient education; they also wanted it to be p
    8 months ago by @prophe
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