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    177 Private Colleges Fail Education Dept.'s Financial-Responsibility Test "According to a Chronicle analysis of data released on Tuesday, 177 private colleges that grant degrees failed a U.S. Education Department test for financial responsibility in the 2014-15 academic year. That's 18 more than the previous year," according to The Chronicle of Higher Education. "Of the institutions that failed, 112 are nonprofit, and the remaining 65 are for-profit. In the previous year, 93 of the 159 failing institutions were nonprofit. The department considers an institution’s debt and assets, among other factors, in giving it a score ranging from -1 to 3. Scores lower than 1.5 are considered failing. The department’s methodology in devising the scores has drawn sharp criticism in the past from some higher-education groups. The latest scores cover the institutions for fiscal years ending between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Several of the colleges have closed since the 2014-15 academic year. Some, like Dowling College, in Oakdale, N.Y., previously failed the financial-responsibility test, while others, like Saint Joseph’s College, in Rensselaer, Ind., passed it." NASFAA's "Headlines" section highlights media coverage of financial aid to help members stay up to date with the latest news. Inclusion in Today's News does not imply endorsement of the material or guarantee the accuracy of information presented. Publication Date: 3/10/2017
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    For those that draw the line in the sand at $5.00 for a “penny stock,” Aspen Group, Inc. (OTCQB:ASPU) may be able to graduate out of penny-stock-land soon. Trading as low as $1.52 last July (and $1.21 in January 2016), the company has found a solid uptrend to tip the scales at $4.44 in December for its current 52-week high. After a pullback from that high, shares are moving up again, including a 7.7% climb in morning trading to $4.04 on Friday. Shares are being driven by the New York City-based post-secondary education company issuing two substantial pieces of news after Thursday’s closing bell. First, in the third quarter of fiscal 2017 (ended January 31, 2017), Aspen reported revenue of $3.74 million, up 73% from the year prior quarter. The company swung to a profit, with net earnings of $7,377 versus a net loss of $689,718 a year earlier. Aspen also had a record number 825 new student enrollments during the latest quarter, a 50% year-over-year increase. Separately, the company said it signed a letter of intent to acquire an unnamed regionally accredited for-profit university based in California for $9.0 million. Payment will come in the form of $2.5 million in cash, $2.0 million in convertible debt and $4.5 million in ASPU common stock. $900,000 of the $2.5 million cash component will be lent to a newly-formed entity controlled by the loan’s guarantor who owns 100% of the voting power of the university.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    The law school once boasted bar-passage rates of more than 90 percent but has seen its percentages drop to about 25 percent among first-time test takers. A for-profit law school in downtown Phoenix that is struggling with falling bar-passage rates is moving to affiliate with one of the country’s historically black colleges and universities. Arizona Summit Law School has signed an affiliation agreement with the private, nonprofit Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida. The law school, founded in 2004, once boasted bar passage rates of 97 percent but has seen its percentages drop to 25 percent among first-time School officials said they have made several changes aimed at improving bar passage, and that the affiliation with Bethune-Cookman will enable them to benefit from the university's academic support services and marketing. A university official also will serve on Arizona Summit's board of trustees. The deal would allow both schools to pursue their objectives of diversifying the legal profession, officials said. "This enables us to take it to a much higher level sooner, swifter and with greater impact," Arizona Summit President Donald Lively said. Bethune-Cookman President Edison Jackson said in a statement, “Together, we aim to be a leading force in disrupting a legacy of exclusion that has persisted into the 21st century.” The affiliation needs the approval of several accrediting bodies, including the American Bar Association and the Arizona Board of Private Postsecondary Education. The agreement doesn't make Arizona Summit a nonprofit school. However, Lively said the school is working toward nonprofit status. Summit’s owner, InfiLaw Corp., also owns law schools in North Carolina and Florida, and the parent company has been controversial in legal circles. A sister school, the Charlotte School of Law, was put on probation by the American Bar Association last year for two years because of concerns over its bar-passage rates, and the U.S. Department of Education in December yanked the C
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Provincial minister for Higher Education Commission, Syed Raza Gillani, has announced that distribution of laptops among university students will start from 13th March. A total of 115,000 laptops will be awarded to deserving students from public sector universities. This announcement was made during a departmental meeting at Civil Secretariat on 8th March. Secretary Higher Education Department Naseem Nawaz and representatives of private universities and Punjab Higher Education Commission attended the meeting. Share of public and private universities According to Prime Minister’s Laptop scheme, only public sector university students were eligible to enroll in the program. This meant that around 110,000 laptops were to be distributed to deserving students enrolled in public universities. However, Punjab government has decided to award additional 5,000 laptops to students from private universities. Talking about this change in policy, Raza Gillani said that provision of laptops to private universities is another ‘first’ of Punjab government. He further added that this would help the students to improve their access to the latest knowledge-trends. Schedule of distribution Distribution of these laptops will start from 13th March. Public sector universities will be the first to get these laptops, with private sector universities coming later down the road.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    The notice under Rule 116 was moved by Congress MLAs Punjabhai Vansh, Mahendrasinh Baraiya, Hirabhai Patel and Mansinh Chauhan. The Gujarat government, on Friday, said that it is actively considering to conduct admissions of professional medical courses at Sumandeep Vidyapeeth, a deemed university at Waghodia of Vadodara and other such universities through the common counselling procedure to be done by the state government. Health Minister Shankar Chaudhary said this from the floor of Gujarat Assembly while making a statement on a discussion under Rule 116 of the Assembly on reports of authorities of Sumandeep Vidyapeeth taking bribes from medical students to get them passed in the examination. The notice under Rule 116 was moved by Congress MLAs Punjabhai Vansh, Mahendrasinh Baraiya, Hirabhai Patel and Mansinh Chauhan. The Congress MLAs alleged that commercialisation of education in Gujarat had resulted in large-scale corruption and the Sumandeep Vidyapeeth incident had caused a sense of fear among the parents and students. President of Sumandeep Vidyapeeth Mansukh Shah and two others were arrested by the Anti-Corruption Bureau for accepting a bribe of Rs 20 lakh from mother of a girl student for letting her fill her medical examination papers last month. Giving a reply on the notice, Chaudhary refuted the allegations levelled by opposition Congress and said that taking due seriousness of the complaint lodged by the mother of the girl student, ACB had conducted decoy operation and then arrested total three persons, including Mansukh Shah. Investigation of the case is on. Chaudhary then said that Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is a deemed university which conducts admissions of various medical examinations on its own while also deciding its fees.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    WAXAHACHIE — Academic Excellence: two puissant words that all schools and university aim for and contend to be the best. Out of 47 private colleges in Texas that offer online courses, Southwestern Assemblies of God University has ranked in the top five of online colleges in Texas by Affordable Colleges Online for the 2016-2017 school year. According to AffordableCollegesOnline.org, "Texas is second in the nation in the number of institutions offering online degree programs. In Texas, online degree programs are designed to provide the same academic quality and rigor as their campus-based equivalents, but with the flexibility and convenience of 24/7 remote access. There are notable schools in the Lone Star State that merit recognition." With an overall high score of 98.71 for it's 53 online programs, 16:1 student-teacher ratio, and 73 percent financial aid assistance, SAGU ranked No. 4 in the poll and stood out amongst larger schools that include Dallas Baptist University, University of Houston-Victoria, and Wayland Baptist University. As stated by the website, "The colleges that made the list of the Best Online Colleges in Texas for 2016—17 have a demonstrated a record of excellence in delivering online programs and support to students at the post-secondary level." Affordable Colleges Online ranked the best online colleges in the state with information gathered by researchers and postsecondary experts. The organization's goal is to find colleges that offer a balance of academics, student support, and affordability concerning online education. Factors considered in the ranking process included in-state tuition and fees for undergraduate students, the percentage of students receiving scholarships or grants from the college, and availability of job placement services for students and graduates. Within SAGU's online programs, the school offers both bachelor and master's degrees in Education, Theology, and Psychology, continuing to grow in other areas of interest. Many of these programs are also available in fast-trac
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Nearly 15,000 Syrians are enrolled in Turkish universities as of the 2016-2017 academic year, Higher Education Board (YÖK) head Yekta Saraç has said. One thirds of Syrian university students are women and the rest are men, while 3,473 Syrian students in the country are receiving education as a part of the special “Turkey Scholarship” program, Saraç added. “Among the overall Syrian student population, 1,149 are postgraduate and 352 are doctorate students. Around 2,000 are receiving education in foundation universities,” he said at a conference on Syrian participation in higher education at Mustafa Kemal University in the southern province of Hatay on March 9. “The fact that the number of Syrian students receiving education in universities [in Turkey] rose to 15,000 this year from 5,000 in 2014-15 and from 10,000 in 2015-16 shows a rapid increase … There are students receiving education on every spot of the Turkish map,” Saraç also stated. Noting that Gaziantep University in the southeastern province of Gaziantep tops the list with 1,680 Syrian students, Saraç added that Istanbul University and Karabük University in the Black Sea province of Karabük are second and third on the list. “Istanbul University follows Gaziantep University with 1,000 students and Karabük University follows it with 927 students. Mersin University, Kahramanmaraş Sütçü İmam University, İnönü University, Çukurova University, Istanbul Aydın University, Yüzüncü Yıl University and Sakarya University are next on the list,” he said. “The example of Karabük University shows that the number of students can be high even in provinces where Syrians are not densely populated. This is related to the number of Syrian lecturers the university employs,” Saraç said. There are currently Syrian students in 35 state and eight private universities across the country, he added. He also referred to the YÖK’s new system for foreign academics launched last year, noting that this system will make it easier for the “eligible Syrian population to participat
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Taylor’s University is ranked no. 29 in the world for Hospitality & Leisure Management Taylor’s University today achieved a global milestone through recognition in the QS World University Ranking by Subject results which positioned the university as number one in Malaysia and top 30 in the world for Hospitality & Leisure Management. Taylor’s University placed alongside renowned universities in Asia, including Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore for the top 5 ranking for the subject. Taylor’s University Vice Chancellor & President, Professor Michael Driscoll shared his elation over this accomplishment, sharing that this accolade further solidified Taylor’s strong standing in this area. “As Taylor’s University moves to the next chapter towards balanced excellence, this accomplishment provides us with a stronger foundation as we continue to attract the best talents, collaborate with the best partners globally and produce the best graduates who make a difference in their communities, wherever they are in the world. This international recognition reflects our perseverance and dedication to provide the highest of quality undergraduate teaching and learning, and a testament of our outstanding academic reputation, employer reputation and our research capability in this particular field,” shared Professor Driscoll. He added that this achievement is indeed an important milestone for Taylor’s, a young, dynamic and ambitious university, in line with its aspiration of becoming one of Asia’s top 100 universities by year 2022. In addition to the recognition for hospitality and tourism management subjects, Taylor’s is also the only private university in Malaysia to receive recognition for the subject of Art & Design, making it to top 200 in the world and top 2 placing in Malaysia, alongside Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM) made it to third placing for this subject in Malaysia. These accomplishments signal that the quality of the teachin
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Seven Missouri private colleges and six from Kansas have failed a U.S. Department of Education test of their financial responsibility during the 2014-2015 academic year. The Chronicle of Higher Education this week released analyzed data that found 177 degree-granting colleges across the country failed the test, 18 more than had failed the previous year. Most of those failing were nonprofits. Only 65 of the failing schools were for-profit institutions. Among them was Wright Career College, a for-profit private school that was based in Overland Park and closed in April 2016 after going bankrupt. The Chronicle of Higher Education reported that in determining whether an institution passes or fails, the Education Department considers an institution’s debt and assets, among other factors. Scores given range from negative-1 to 3, and any score below 1.5 is considered failing. These schools are subject to cash monitoring and other federally imposed requirements. A school could raise concerns about its financial responsibility and end up on the monitoring list for late financial statements, outstanding liabilities and accreditation issues. The scores are made public by the federal Education Department as some broad indication of the financial health of thousands of two- and four-year schools. The idea is to give tuition-paying students and parents a better look at what their money is buying and how it’s being used. “The department’s methodology in devising the scores has drawn sharp criticism in the past from some higher-education groups,” the Chronicle of Higher Education reported. Among the schools in Missouri listed with a failing score for the 2014-2015 academic year is Westminster College in Fulton with a score of 1.1. But school officials said the college has subsequently improved performance and the reported score “does not reflect our college’s current financial conditions,” said Lana Poole, college spokeswoman. Poole said Westminster’s composite score for financial responsibility would increase to 2.7 fo
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    BOND University at Robina has been listed in the prestigious global top 20 universities in the Times Higher Education (THE) Rankings of the Best Small Universities in the World. The private, not-for-profit university placed number 20 in the global ranking thanks to its personalised teaching philosophy and outstanding student experience which translates to extraordinary student satisfaction ratings. The Best Small Universities list acknowledges universities with an unparalleled reputation for delivering personalised learning and creating an environment that fosters a strong sense of community. It is topped by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) which is also ranked this year as the second best overall university in the world, behind Oxford. Bond University is the only university in the southern hemisphere to be included in the global top 20. Bond University Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Tim Brailsford, said the ranking was recognition of Bond’s never-ending and priority focus on the students and their learning experience. “Our point of difference has always been creating an environment that focuses on a personalised approach to learning and a student’s education, so that each and every student has the opportunity to realise their ambition; and this global ranking is recognition that we are delivering on our promise,” he said. “There are some truly outstanding universities in this list and we are quite humbled to be included in such company. “For one of Australia’s youngest universities we have come a long way in a very short period of time.” Bond was also recently ranked as Australia’s number one university for student experience for the 11th consecutive year in the 2017 Good Universities Guide. Business student Alice Ringelstein said she chose to study at Bond because of its smaller size, which enabled her to spend more one-on-one time with her teachers and gain the most out of her experience. “The small class sizes at Bond have given me the opportunity to participate in stimula
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Dive Brief: Career training programs will have until July 1 to appeal the U.S. Department of Education for reconsideration of compliance under current gainful employment and revenue reporting guidance enacted by the Obama administration, a signal that the Trump administration is holding to promises of massive deregulation in the federal education agency. The extended review period will allow schools the chance to prove they were unfairly assessed in previous years, under rules requiring that graduates' loan payments do not exceed 20% of their discretionary income or 8% of total earnings, metrics that many for-profit college advocates say was an unfair rule designed to disrupt for-profit impact in higher education. For-profit leaders applauded the extension, but opponents say the delays will allow more students to potentially be defrauded by predatory recruitment schemes and false information about postgraduate outcomes. Dive Insight: The extended review of the gainful employment policies will have impact throughout the higher education sector, as community colleges and schools which disproportionately serve poorer students will now have time to provide more context about graduation rates and employment outcomes which previously may not have been possible due to time constraints. Additionally, the extension signals the first sign of regulatory repeals for higher education, one of the only signature details of President Trump's higher education platform during the campaign season, and a recurring theme shared by Congressional higher education leaders. For most institutions, this is a positive sign towards reducing costs and manpower committed to compliance efforts, but for smaller institutions with missions to serve underrepresented populations, it may be a lifeline.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Many for-profit colleges are accused of broken promises, high prices and not preparing students for the workforce. The federal government has increased its regulation of them. It's sparking a big debate in Washington, and two of the main players are North Carolina politicians. The new chair of the U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-- N.C., District 5) already said the rules need to go. The way she sees it, the Obama administration "intentionally targeted and sought to dismantle career colleges and universities with unnecessary regulations." She praised for-profit schools, calling them "responsive higher learning institutions." Action 9 investigator Jason Stoogenke found her biggest donor is a for-profit college, Full Sail. Full Sail is based in Florida and focuses on entertainment and media, offering degrees up to master's. When Stoogenke asked Foxx whether that's a conflict of interest, she emailed, "When an individual or industry offers me their support, they're endorsing my views, not the other way around." On the other side, 18 attorneys general, including North Carolina's Josh Stein, are urging the federal government not to go easy on for-profit schools. They sent the federal government a letter, saying undoing the regulations would mean "open season" on students. "We're very concerned," he said. "They're preying on people's dreams." LETTER When students can't pay back debt, taxpayers get stuck with the bill. Some wonder how much debt students rack up at for-profit colleges. The Brookings Institution created a list of 25 colleges where students are the most in debt. More than half are for-profit schools. Charlotte School of Law, DeVry, ITT Tech, Brookstone and Kaplan have all had problems in recent years, either financial, legal, or both. "It's been really hard," Charlotte Law student Stefanie Quinde said. "I understand it's a business. But at end of day, the interest of the students, it's, it's a big priority." "I think the regulat
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    The U.S. Department of Education this week released the annual update of its financial responsibility test scores for private colleges, which is based on data from 2014-15. The 187 institutions that have a failing score -- most of which are small and either private nonprofit or for-profit -- will lose access to federal financial aid without a provisional certification from the department. The department may also require colleges with low or failing scores to take out a letter of credit or be subject to a sanction called heightened cash monitoring. The test was designed to keep tabs on the fiscal stability of colleges, with an eye toward preventing financial aid from going to institutions that may shut down abruptly. For example, Dowling College, which shut down last year, has a failing score on the new list. However, many private college officials have for years criticized the department's methodology for the test. They say the scoring system fails to use generally accepted accounting practices, is backward looking and does not capture the complexity of a college budget. For example, a decline in a college endowment's investment value is counted as an operating loss. The department's Office of Inspector General recently agreed with some of that criticism, noting in an audit released last week that the test's methodology should be improved.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    According to the U.S. Department of Education, more than 750 higher education institutions closed last year, including for-profit schools. Among these closing schools are private nonprofit colleges no longer able to fill the gaps between revenue and expenses and sustain operations while debt remains unpaid. While very few of the higher education institutions closing each year are private nonprofit schools, the annual number has tripled since the recession and is anticipated to remain stable or increase further, according to a 2015 Moody’s report. Many of the schools most at risk have fewer than 500 students and are affiliated with religious denominations. When a college or university goes bankrupt, what happens to its endowment? Most financially troubled schools have modest endowments, and some of the funds within the endowments are restricted by their donors to specific “for good, forever” purposes rather than immediate general support like debt relief. For example, Art Rebrovick, restructuring officer for Virginia Intermont College, which closed in 2014, said, “The endowment was on the books for $4 million, but it had been leveraged and used for faculty salaries so many times that there was just literally no money there.” If there is money left, there can be a fight between creditors, or between successor institutions taking up the responsibility of educating students. When Chester College in New Hampshire closed, it designated New England College as the recipient of its residual assets. This practice follows state and IRS guidelines that direct dissolving 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations to give remaining funds to other nonprofits with similar missions, services, clientele, etc. However, the New England Institute of Art challenged the decision because it said that it was taking 92 percent of Chester College’s students and that act should be supported by the college’s residual endowment. Ultimately, the New Hampshire courts decided that the funds would be split 60-40 between the two schools, with New England
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    A report released Thursday highlights the potential impact Gov. Andrew Cuomo's free public college tuition proposal could have on New York's independent and private colleges. The Commission on Independent Colleges & Universities in New York estimated that 54,079 fewer students would enroll in the state's private institutions if Cuomo's plan is adopted. The organization also estimates that 44,693 jobs would be lost due to the student reductions and communities would lose more than $224 million in tax revenue because of the ensuing job cuts. At private colleges in central New York, enrollment would decline by 4,067 students and 2,269 jobs would be cut. The surrounding communities would lose a projected $9.8 million in tax revenue, according to the study. Mary Beth Labate, a former State University of New York official who once served as Cuomo's budget director, is the president of the commission. She said the negative effects of the free tuition discussion are already being observed. "Words move markets," she said. "Enrollment is in jeopardy, capital projects have been put on hold and campuses are making plans for a series of layoffs in the coming months to close potential gaps." Abbey Fashouer, a spokeswoman for Cuomo, touted the state's support for private colleges — more than $2.4 billion in aid since 2011 — claimed that the independent institutions haven't agreed to cap "out-of-control tuition costs" at least than $500 a year for state support. "New York leads the nation in providing support to both low-income and private college students through our already robust $1 billion tuition assistance program and loan forgiveness initiatives," Fashouer said. "With private school tuition in New York averaging $34,000 a year compared to $6,400 at SUNY and CUNY — the numbers speak for themselves." Private college leaders have expressed concerns about Cuomo's proposal since it was first unveiled in January. The governor wants to provide free tuition at SUNY and City University of New York institutions for st
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    The Office of the Higher Education Commission (Ohec) has threatened to wind up 98 bachelor's and master's programmes run by 10 private universities after a probe found the courses did not meet its quality ...
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    The Trump administration is delaying implementation of one of the signature policies of the Obama-era crackdown on for-profit colleges. The Department of Education announced Monday night it was targeting the Obama administration rule aimed at holding career-training programs accountable for getting students decent jobs and earnings. To be in compliance with the regulations, career-training programs, which are largely at for-profit colleges, need to graduate students whose loan payments don’t exceed 20% of their discretionary income or 8% of their total earnings. Programs that don’t fit this criteria for multiple years could lose access to federal financial aid. Career-training schools will now have until July 1 to file appeals to the program debt-to-earnings ratios published by the Department earlier this year, as part of the enforcement of the gainful employment (GE) rule. Originally, their appeals were due Friday, March 10. The schools will also now have until July 1 to publish disclosures about their debt-to-earnings ratio that are required by the new law. Before this decision, the programs had until April 3 to post those disclosures. The gainful employment rules were a long fought victory for the Obama administration in its quest to crack down on for-profit colleges, which officials and advocates have accused of loading students up with high debt loads for questionable outcomes. The for-profit college industry fought the regulations in court and the Obama administration ultimately prevailed. But the Trump administration’s embrace of an increased role for the private sector in education has had supporters of efforts to crack down on for-profit colleges worried that the new rules could be in jeopardy — and investors betting on for-profit schools. The delay is the first signal that that speculation may be correct. “This is a sign that does nothing to dispel concerns that this administration will be sufficiently aggressive in protecting students,” said Ben Miller, the senior director of postsecondary educati
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    The UK government will decide whether BPP University should continue to be eligible for university title and degree-awarding powers, after its US owner was sold to a private equity consortium for $1.1 billion (£899 million). BPP, one of only three for-profit universities in the UK, saw the sale of its owner, Apollo Education Group, completed last month. The deal, which takes the company private, also includes its big US for-profit institutions, such as the University of Phoenix and Western International University. The new owners are a consortium including Vistria Group, a private equity firm run by Marty Nesbitt – a Chicago businessman sometimes described as Barack Obama’s best friend – and former US deputy education secretary Tony Miller. The consortium also includes “funds affiliated” with private equity firm Apollo Global Management, according to the Washington Post. The change of ownership for BPP comes as the UK government nears the final stages of steering through Parliament the Higher Education and Research Bill, which aims to further open England’s sector to new private and for-profit providers. While ministers believe that new providers are needed to introduce greater competition for established universities, critics believe creating more for-profit universities that can go through repeated changes in ownership may have an impact on quality for students. An independent review of BPP will now be submitted to the Higher Education Funding Council for England, including checks on whether the institution continues to meet student number and governance requirements. Hefce will, in turn, advise the Department for Education on the institution's future status. Carl Lygo, BPP's vice-chancellor, said that "nothing has changed" at the university since the sale was announced. "Neither of the new owners has any record in delivering higher education in the UK and so their plans will be carefully scrutinised by the Department for Education," Professor Lygo said. "This is not a rubber stamp process." A DfE spok
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    According to a Chronicle analysis of data released on Tuesday, 177 private colleges that grant degrees failed a U.S. Education Department test for financial responsibility in the 2014-15 academic year. That’s 18 more than the previous year. Of the institutions that failed, 112 are nonprofit, and the remaining 65 are for-profit. In the previous year, 93 of the 159 failing institutions were nonprofit. The department considers an institution’s debt and assets, among other factors, in giving it a score ranging from -1 to 3. Scores lower than 1.5 are considered failing. The department’s methodology in devising the scores has drawn sharp criticism in the past from some higher-education groups. The latest scores cover the institutions for fiscal years ending between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Several of the colleges have closed since the 2014-15 academic year. Some, like Dowling College, in Oakdale, N.Y., previously failed the financial-responsibility test, while others, like Saint Joseph’s College, in Rensselaer, Ind., passed it.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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    Webster will host a conference of independent colleges in mid-March titled “Securing America’s Future: The Power of a Liberal Arts Education.” The conference is hosted by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), an organization of small, non-profit private liberal arts colleges. It is intended as a workshop for leaders of these colleges on the future of liberal arts education in America. The CIC works to provide resources to and promote the visibility of its member colleges. Webster president Elizabeth Stroble will speak at the workshop, along with several other university presidents. “This workshop offers private college leaders in the region an opportunity to discuss responses to significant and continuing changes in higher education, the nation, and the world around us,” Rich Ekman, president of the CIC, said in a press release. “Sharing insights and research will help their institutions deal more effectively with both the trends they face today and future issues.
    6 months ago by @prophe
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