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    Private universities have been expanding rapidly worldwide but particularly in developing countries, as rising demand for higher education has meant private providers plug a gap that publicly-financed institutions cannot fill fast enough, according to a new study.
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The law school once boasted bar-passage rates of more than 90 percent but has seen its percentages drop to about 25 percent among first-time test takers. A for-profit law school in downtown Phoenix that is struggling with falling bar-passage rates is moving to affiliate with one of the country’s historically black colleges and universities. Arizona Summit Law School has signed an affiliation agreement with the private, nonprofit Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida. The law school, founded in 2004, once boasted bar passage rates of 97 percent but has seen its percentages drop to 25 percent among first-time School officials said they have made several changes aimed at improving bar passage, and that the affiliation with Bethune-Cookman will enable them to benefit from the university's academic support services and marketing. A university official also will serve on Arizona Summit's board of trustees. The deal would allow both schools to pursue their objectives of diversifying the legal profession, officials said. "This enables us to take it to a much higher level sooner, swifter and with greater impact," Arizona Summit President Donald Lively said. Bethune-Cookman President Edison Jackson said in a statement, “Together, we aim to be a leading force in disrupting a legacy of exclusion that has persisted into the 21st century.” The affiliation needs the approval of several accrediting bodies, including the American Bar Association and the Arizona Board of Private Postsecondary Education. The agreement doesn't make Arizona Summit a nonprofit school. However, Lively said the school is working toward nonprofit status. Summit’s owner, InfiLaw Corp., also owns law schools in North Carolina and Florida, and the parent company has been controversial in legal circles. A sister school, the Charlotte School of Law, was put on probation by the American Bar Association last year for two years because of concerns over its bar-passage rates, and the U.S. Department of Education in December yanked the C
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    BOND University at Robina has been listed in the prestigious global top 20 universities in the Times Higher Education (THE) Rankings of the Best Small Universities in the World. The private, not-for-profit university placed number 20 in the global ranking thanks to its personalised teaching philosophy and outstanding student experience which translates to extraordinary student satisfaction ratings. The Best Small Universities list acknowledges universities with an unparalleled reputation for delivering personalised learning and creating an environment that fosters a strong sense of community. It is topped by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) which is also ranked this year as the second best overall university in the world, behind Oxford. Bond University is the only university in the southern hemisphere to be included in the global top 20. Bond University Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Tim Brailsford, said the ranking was recognition of Bond’s never-ending and priority focus on the students and their learning experience. “Our point of difference has always been creating an environment that focuses on a personalised approach to learning and a student’s education, so that each and every student has the opportunity to realise their ambition; and this global ranking is recognition that we are delivering on our promise,” he said. “There are some truly outstanding universities in this list and we are quite humbled to be included in such company. “For one of Australia’s youngest universities we have come a long way in a very short period of time.” Bond was also recently ranked as Australia’s number one university for student experience for the 11th consecutive year in the 2017 Good Universities Guide. Business student Alice Ringelstein said she chose to study at Bond because of its smaller size, which enabled her to spend more one-on-one time with her teachers and gain the most out of her experience. “The small class sizes at Bond have given me the opportunity to participate in stimula
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The government has suffered further defeats in the House of Lords on plans in England for the teaching excellence framework and the opening up of the sector to new private providers. Earlier in the week, peers defeated the government by passing an amendment that ensures the results of the TEF should not be used to determine the fees that an institution can charge. On 8 March, the House of Lords – where the government does not have a majority – inflicted further defeats. The government now has the choice of accepting the amendments, or bidding to force through its proposals with the backing of MPs. An amendment, proposed by crossbencher Baroness Wolf, Labour peer Lord Stevenson and Liberal Democrat Lord Storey, was passed that would severely limit the government’s flagship plans to bring in new providers to compete with universities. Critics backing the amendment had warned of risks from for-profit providers gaining degree awarding powers and university status. The amendment would ensure new providers either remain subject to the same requirement to pass through four years of validation before they can gain their own degree awarding powers, or had been granted permission to use such powers by a quality assessment committee. The government had wanted private providers to be able to award degrees on a probationary basis from the start of their operation and for England’s new regulator, the Office for Students, to take over the granting of degree awarding powers. The OfS would also have to be “assured that the provider operated in the public interest and in the interest of students” to gain degree powers, says the amendment, passed by 201 votes to 186. On the TEF, peers also backed an amendment that would ensure the government still creates “a scheme to assess and provide consistent and reliable information about the quality of education and teaching”, but prevents such an exercise from being used “to create a single composite ranking of English higher education providers”, as well as ensuring that its data a
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    More than 150,000 students qualify for university admission annually, but only 27,000 can be accommodated in state-run universities, State Minister of Higher Education Mohan Lal Grero said. He said others, numbering around 130,000 were left out and some of them opted for vocational education and related areas in the governmental institutions. The Minister was addressing a seminar organised by the Agriculture Faculty of the Peradeniya University, under the theme ‘Peradeniya University and Sri Lanka Food Industry-the inter relationship’ as part of its diamond jubilee commemoration of the University at the Hector Kobbekaduwa Institute, Colombo. That was the reason the government had decided to support private higher education sector, Grero said. The government would introduce a loan scheme for students who had financial problems to enrol in higher education institutes in Sri Lanka. "If we have quality higher educational institutions within the country foreign exchange can be saved," Grero said. The minister said they would also focus on further developing the state education sector. The government was planning to increase state university intake by 15% by 2020. According to its policy the main target was to increase the intake up to 50,000 students by 2020, Grero said.
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The vice-chancellor of the University of Nairobi has asked the government to review the budgetary allocation to his university after the treasury failed to meet public universities’ requisitions for the forthcoming fiscal year. The total allocation to all public universities, which is US$200 million less than the amount requested, has dashed the hopes of several institutions facing a crippling cash crunch. The government has allocated US$982 million to her public universities for the 2017-18 financial year in the budget to be unveiled in parliament on 30 March. University administrators say the allocation is over US$200 million lower than the amount they had requested for the period. At US$721 million, however, the amount is 36% higher than the allocation in the current financial year. The research and innovation kitty for public universities has been set at US$42 million, up from US$37 million – a 13% increase. However, the lower-than-expected allocation means the universities themselves will have to effect budget cuts at a time when they are facing a series of challenges. Public universities agreed last week to increase salaries for lecturers by 17.5% after a 54-day strike that paralysed the sector. The agreed increase means universities will have to seek more funds to finance the increment. Professor Peter Mbithi has asked parliament to reconsider a budget cut of US$17 million slapped on the University of Nairobi. “We acknowledge that we have been facing financial challenges like any other public entity due to declining budgetary support. We have asked parliament to review the allocation,” Mbithi told reporters two weeks ago. New funding model Defending the budget cuts to universities, treasury said they were based on the new financing model known as the differentiated unit cost model, in terms of which state funds are allocated on the basis of the courses being taught at specific universities. Under the new policy, subsidies for science courses are relatively higher than those for arts. Data shows th
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    Generally, prestigious private universities with hundreds of students don't get shut down over fairly minor, six-month-old technical issues that have since been resolved. But that is precisely the predicament facing the European University at Saint Petersburg, a bastion of Western liberal arts, which has been ordered closed by a district court after a furious conservative assault against it, writes Fred Weir for The Christian Science Monitor. The university’s problems began last June, when an ultra-conservative lawmaker from Saint Petersburg, Vitaly Milonov, lodged an official complaint against it, which under Russian law requires an official investigation to be launched. Milonov is a key author of Russia's "anti-gay propaganda" law. Reached by telephone, Milonov, now a deputy of the State Duma, insisted that he merely passed along complaints made to him by citizens, including a letter he allegedly received from five students of the university. The students "raised a bunch of issues about the quality and services of the school", he said. "I can't remember most of them, but one was the teaching of gender studies at the school. I personally find that disgusting; it’s fake studies, and it may well be illegal," he said. "But I'm not qualified to judge, so I handed it on to the proper authorities."
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The Bihar Legislative Council today passed seven bills including the Bihar Private University (Amendment) Bill, 2017 which paved way for running private universities from rented premises in the state. State Education minister Ashok Choudhary introduced the bill proposing to allow private universities to function from rented premises with a built up area of 5,000 sqm up to two years till construction of permanent infrastructure. Countering BJP member Vinod Narayan Jha's assertion that not a single university has shown interest in opening its campus in Bihar, Choudhary said the state government has received 14 proposals for setting up universities. Out of them, the government has set up a committee to look into the Detailed Project Report of 12 proposals. Three universities would start running their courses soon and the government has decided to allow such universities to run their academic activities from rented accommodation for two years if they fulfil all requisite criteria, he said. "Our aim is to increase the Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) in universities. So, we opened the door for private institutions. At present, the state's GER is 13.9 per cent against the national average of 24 per cent. The government intends to push that up to 30 per cent by 2020," he said. State Parliamentary Affairs minister Shrawan Kumar introduced the Bihar State Legislature (Members' salaries, allowances and pension) (amendment) Bill, 2017 which was passed by the legislative Assembly yesterday. An amendment has been proposed in the preamble of the State Legislature (Members' salaries, allowances and pension) (Amendment) Act to incorporate provision of pension for retired members of the bicameral state legislature. The House passed Bihar Farmers and Rural Areas Development Agency (Repeal) Bill, 2017, the Patna University (Amendment) Bill, 2017, the Bihar State University (Amendment) Bill, 2017 and the Bihar Appropriation Excess Expenditure Bill, 2017. The Legislative Council also passed the Bihar Protection of Interest of Dep
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The Pt B D Sharma University of Health Sciences, Rohtak will also conduct combined counselling on the basis of merit of National Eligibility and Entrance Test NEET PG 2017. The Haryana government on March 28 announced that no private medical or dental college, including those under private or deemed university, are authorised to carry out their own counselling for admission to post graduate courses. The NEET post graduate admissions will be conducted in both undergraduate and postgraduate courses have to be done on the basis of NEET scores. The Pt B D Sharma University of Health Sciences, Rohtak will also conduct combined counselling on the basis of merit of National Eligibility and Entrance Test NEET PG 2017 and NEET MDS 2017 for admission to post graduate courses for academic session 2017-18 in all the government, government-aided, private medical and dental institutes including those under private and deemed universities in the state. Applicants can choose among various subjects which include MD, MS, PG Diploma and MDS, a spokesman of Haryana Directorate of Medical Education and Research. He also stated that the candidates desirous of seeking admission to MD, MS, PG Diploma and MDS courses would apply online for registration on the web portal — uhspgadmissions.in. ALSO READ: JIPMER Exam 2017: What you need to know about JIPMER MBBS entrance exam For the candidates seeking admissions need to know that the final allotment of seat/specialty/institute will be done by the admission committee after physical verification of eligibility criteria and original documents. Another important point that the aspirants must note that they should be personally present of the candidate in front of the admission committee at the time of counselling would be compulsory, he said. It is also While referring to the counselling schedule for admissions, the last date for submission of online application forms is April 8. The main counseling registration, choice filing & indicative seat allotment for NEET PG 2017 has commenced at
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    AGRA: Acting on a directive from chief minister Yogi Adityanath to curb the menace of mass cheating in the ongoing UP Board examinations, a team of invigilators led by Agra University vice-chancellor conducted a surprise raid at a private college and caught the owner red-handed while assisting students in copying. The raid was conducted on Wednesday evening by a four-member team at Manish Sharma College on Deori road under Sadar police jurisdiction. The private college is owned by Prashant Sharma. Talking to TOI, professor Luvkush Mishra, a team member, said, "It was astonishing to see that the owner of the college was acting as the center superintendent for examinations in the college. There was no principal or invigilators in the college." According to university norms, only principal, center superintendent and invigilators are allowed during exam hours. "Acting as the centre superintendent, Prashant was signing and collecting the answer-sheets that were mostly blank. After examination hours, he gave those blank answer sheets to the boys he had hired and dictated answers to them," said professor Mishra. The team found several bundles of answer sheets at Prashant's office that were not sealed after the exams. Arvind Dixit, VC of Agra University, said, "After conducting the exam, the answer sheets must be sealed within half-an-hour in the presence of invigilators and centre superintendent. However, we found several bundles that were not sealed." The team members said that after the boys had filled up the sheets, Prashant placed it between the bundles and sent it to the respective centres. On Wednesday , the team seized all the answer sheets and urged the regional higher education officer to take strict action against the accused. In order to conduct the remaining examinations, the VC has allotted four invigilators and a center superintendent from Agra University to Manish Sharma College. According to an Agra University official, CM Aditya Nath Yogi had called a high-level meeting of university VCs on Tuesday an
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search. Most medical school graduates leave school with a significant amount of student debt, and their debt burden tends to be higher if they attended private medical schools. But private medical schools vary widely in price. Among ranked private schools in the 2018 Best Medical Schools research and primary care rankings, the cost of tuition and fees for the 2016-2017 school year ranges from $32,663 per year at Baylor College of Medicine to $63,890 per year at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. At the 10 least expensive ranked private medical schools, tuition and fees for the 2016-2017 school year were slightly more than $43,700 on average compared with the typical price at a private medical school, which was nearly $53,900 annually. Six of these 10 schools were ranked in the bottom one-fourth in the medical school rankings, and are labeled Rank Not Published. Below is a list of the 10 ranked private medical schools with the lowest tuition and fees in 2016. Two of these schools offer discounts to in-state residents – the Baylor College of Medicine and the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. The prices given for the schools in this article are the full-freight rates paid by out-of-state students. Unranked schools, which did not meet certain criteria required by U.S. News to be numerically ranked, were not considered for this report. U.S. News surveyed 170 medical schools for our 2016 survey of research and primary care programs. Schools self-reported myriad data regarding their academic programs and the makeup of their student body, among
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    Hungarian leaders continued their assault on civil society this week with philanthropist George Soros still squarely in their sights. Legislation proposed by the right-wing Fidsez government as part of their self-proclaimed “spring offensive” targets foreign educational institutions, like the Soros-funded Central European University, with tighter regulations. With further crackdowns planned on NGOs, will the European Union step in? Both Soros and U.S. leaders expressed outrage over the new proposal, although the Hungarian-born billionaire is a frequent punching bag of America’s conservative leaders and the current administration. “The United States is very concerned about the legislation proposed by the Hungarian government yesterday that would severely impact the operations of the Central European University in Budapest,” U.S. Charge d’Affaires in Hungary David Kostelancik said in a statement to Bloomberg. The U.S. “opposes any effort to compromise the operations or independence of the University,” he said. As NPQ reported, the U.S. commitment to protecting human rights at home and abroad was recently called into question when Secretary of State Rex Tillerson downplayed the release of the annual Human Rights Report. Soros is also a controversial figure abroad, where he has offices of his Open Society Foundations running in 37 countries. In the European Union, he has been particularly vocal about member states doing their part to relieve the international refugee crisis, which is at odds with the anti-refugee policies of Hungary under Prime Minister Viktor Orbán. Orbán, who has vowed to purse an “illiberal democracy” modeled on those in Russia and Turkey, is stepping up a campaign to sideline opposition voices, Bloomberg reported. One of Europe’s strongest advocates of U.S. President Donald Trump, the former anti-communist student leader has overseen the most extensive centralization of power in Hungary since the fall of the Iron Curtain after returning to office in 2010. Soros founded Central European Univer
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    It might just be career government lawyers doing their jobs, and doing them well, until the Trump Administration can catch up and work its malevolence, but in court papers filed today, the Trump Justice Department defended the Obama Administration’s gainful employment rule, a measure aimed at curbing predatory abuses by for-profit colleges. The rule penalizes expensive career college programs that, year after year, leave graduates with debts that, based on their earnings, they cannot afford to repay. “The public interest is served by allowing the Department to go forward with implementing the GE regulations,” Justice Department lawyers wrote on behalf of their client, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, who is being sued by an association of cosmetology schools. The association’s somewhat risque argument is that many hairdressers and other beauty professionals do not report all their tip income to the IRS, and thus their graduates actually are doing better than the gainful employment calculations give them credit for. Revised under pressure from industry lobbyists, the Obama Administration’s rule is not very strong, but it does endanger some of the worst-of-the-worst college programs. The operators of those programs, who have been raking in billions in taxpayer money, want to make sure they can still act with impunity, even though their abuses have ruined the lives of countless veterans, single moms, and other students. There are good cosmetology schools, as well as other types of career schools. The gainful employment rule aims to channel resources and students to those quality, affordable schools, and away from the kind of for-profit colleges that law enforcement agencies are investigating or prosecuting for fraud. But given: that Donald Trump was previously the proprietor of his own predatory for-profit real estate “university”; that Trump crony Newt Gingrich and congressional Republicans have aggressively advocated for the for-profit college industry; that DeVos has been invested in for-profit education
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    All three of England’s for-profit universities owned in Netherlands Calls have been made for greater scrutiny of the ownership of for-profit higher education providers after it emerged that BPP University is owned in the Netherlands by its US parent. The disclosure means that all three of England’s for-profit universities are owned in the Netherlands, which is known for its attractive corporate tax regime. However, Apollo Education Group, which has owned BPP since 2010 and was recently bought by two US private equity firms, said it did not gain any tax advantage from Dutch ownership of the institution. BPP has benefited from £26.6 million in tuition fee payments via the public Student Loans Company over five years since 2011, according to SLC figures. Companies House documents show that BPP University is owned by BPP Holdings, which is in turn owned by Apollo UK Acquisition Company Limited, which is itself owned by Coöperatieve Apollo Global Netherlands UA (UA is the abbreviation for the Dutch-language term for “excluded liability”). England’s two other for-profit universities, the University of Law and Arden University, are both owned by Global University Systems, a company whose leadership is Russian and which is registered in the Netherlands as a “BV”, the Dutch equivalent of a private limited liability company. The government’s Higher Education and Research Bill, currently making its way through Parliament, aims to bring in more private and for-profit providers to compete with universities. Times Higher Education asked Apollo why BPP is ultimately owned in the Netherlands, whether or not Netherlands ownership conferred any tax advantages for Apollo, and whether the location of ownership is likely to change under the new owners of Apollo. A spokesman for Apollo Global, the group’s subsidiary for its non-US operations, said: “Apollo Global’s Dutch structure was put into place in 2011 in conjunction with the development of a new global learning platform. We do not gain any tax advantages related to the s
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    A new report from the American Enterprise Institute argues that state and local funding of public colleges stacks the deck against for-profit institutions under the gainful-employment rule, an Obama administration regulation that measures the ability of graduates of vocational programs to repay their student loans. The rule covers nondegree programs at nonprofit colleges -- mostly community colleges -- and all for-profit programs. Roughly three-quarters of for-profit programs pass the rule, the report said, compared to a relatively small number of nonprofits that are covered under gainful employment. Direct public funding drives much of that disparity, according to the report's authors. "Higher tuition at for-profits means students take on more debt, while public institutions have the luxury of charging lower tuition due to their direct appropriations," the report said. "Therefore, even if a for-profit institution and a public institution have similar overall expenditures (costs) and graduate earnings (returns on investment), the for-profit institution will be more likely to fail the gainful-employment rule, since more of its costs are reflected in student debt." Congressional Republicans and the Trump administration have said they will seek to roll back gainful employment and other Obama-era regulations aimed at for-profits. But such nixing of the rules likely will take time. And this week the U.S. Education Department defended gainful employment in federal court.
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    Both opponents and proponents of SAITM have been coming up with their vigorous arguments. This subject has been debated by politicians, academics and public in many forums. People of different political parties have been demonstrating for and against SAITM. Both arguments have some valid points but which argument over weights today in this modern world? Which argument is most viable and most practical one today in this modern globalized and competing world of brain powers and human resources. I will share my thought on this issue objectively without any bias. Opponents argue that they want to secure free education, they want to maintain the quality of medical education in Sri Lanka, they want to protect the rights of patients in Sri Lanka and they want to protect and preserve the integrity of medical profession. They come up with many good and valid points. I fully agree with them in some of their points. To privatise medical education in a country like Sri Lanka would be dangerous. It has been claimed in India you can buy any degree certificates even MBBS certificates with bribes. We do not want to see that in Sri Lanka. Please do not tell me that we do not have crooks in Higher education. Some crooks may try to make money out of this private medical colleges. With political influences in Sri Lanka, not only medical degrees you could buy PhDs in Sri Lanka. We have seen this in Sri Lanka in recent past. The quality and integrity of university education is fading away in Sri Lanka slowly and gradually. Sometime less qualified people are recruited into university post with political influence. Recent events in Jaffna University is a good example for this political influence. Politicians have been influencing in public institutions, schools, universities, public offices and in many government departments in Sri Lanka. This is not a secret in Sri Lanka and everyone knows this. Except JVP all political parties will use their political influence in these public affairs. I see some valid points in these arguments. No
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    In Pennsylvania, which has the second-most private colleges in the nation, moves to better target delivery of higher education will have implications not only for legions of public classroom students but for those on private campuses, too. The state’s 90-plus private institutions enroll about 290,000 students, 42 percent of the state’s market, and they award 49 percent of the degrees from associate to doctoral level, according to the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania. Its president, Don Francis, said Friday that his group has not taken any position on the review getting underway across the 14 state-owned universities, a process that could lead to shifts in classroom offerings, consolidation or other moves. Nevertheless, he said he hopes the State System of Higher Education and the state itself understand that their decisions will be felt beyond the 14 universities, beset with enrollment and financial woes. His members face many of the same issues that public campuses do, including population decline and fewer high school graduates. “It’s good to keep in mind that any changes to the State System will have an impact on private institutions, as well as the state-related institutions, and the community colleges,” Mr. Francis said. “All the sectors should be considered before any final recommendations are implemented.” Kenn Marshall, a State System spokesman, said chancellor Frank Brogan has expressed a similar interest. In remarks to the Legislature and elsewhere, Mr. Brogan has said greater dialogue should occur with private campuses, as well as with two-year schools and the state-related campuses of the University of Pittsburgh, Penn State, Temple and Lincoln universities. “Everybody who is involved in higher education is technically competition,” Mr. Marshall said. “I think [Mr. Brogan] would prefer to see us collaborate more.” A 2012 consultant’s study for the State System by Maguire Associates of Concord, Mass., found that among students who turned down a State System of
    10 months ago by @prophe
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    Generally, prestigious private universities with hundreds of students don't get shut down over fairly minor, six-month-old technical issues that have since been resolved. But that is precisely the predicament facing the two-decade-old European University at St. Petersburg, a bastion of Western liberal arts, which has been ordered closed by a district court after a furious conservative assault against it. What appears to be on full display is a hallmark of the Vladimir Putin-era: a new brand of domestic "lawfare," in which state-run courts enforce political conformity through legal pretexts. Unlike blatant Soviet-style repression, outcomes are shaped through complicated, often years-long court battles that seem to lead inexorably to the politically desired verdict. One illustrative recent example is a local court's upholding of an embezzlement conviction against opposition leader Alexei Navalny, which has the collateral effect of barring him from running in presidential elections that are about a year away. Kremlin supporters will denounce such a description as an example of Western arrogance, aimed at defaming Russian courts and rule of law. It's a debate that cannot be easily settled. 'Fake studies'? But consider the case of the European University, a private post-graduate school that currently has about 260 students – many of them from abroad – and whose main campus occupies the magnificent Small Marble Palace in St. Petersburg's historic heart. The school was founded in a different political era, in 1994, with support from the city's then-mayor, reformist Anatoly Sobchak, and substantial donations from a range of international organizations, including the Soros, MacArthur, and Spencer foundations. It's one of the few private universities in Russia that is fully licensed to issue graduate degrees by the Ministry of Education, and has been consistently rated among the top universities in Russia. The school's curriculum is heavy on political science, sociology, history, and economics. Many classes are tau
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publications  296